[syndicated profile] zooborns_feed

Posted by Chris Eastland

1_Baby Elephant Joy Outside-0010-7098

After a two-year pregnancy, the wait is over for the Houston Zoo’s Asian Elephant, Shanti. On July 12, the 26-year-old gave birth to a 305-pound female.

The calf has been named Joy by the zoo team that has dedicated their lives to the care, wellbeing, and conservation of these incredible animals.

Baby elephants are quite wobbly when they’re first born, so the harness seen on the images and video of Joy assists the elephant team to help her stand-steady while she’s nursing.

Shanti gave birth in the Houston Zoo’s McNair Asian Elephant Habitat cow barn under the supervision of keepers and veterinary staff. She and her calf underwent post-natal exams and are now spending several days bonding behind the scenes. During this important bonding period, the elephant team is watching for the pair to share key moments like communication and hitting weight goals.

“Our animal team is thrilled that the birth has gone smoothly,” said Lisa Marie Avendano, Vice President of Animal Operations at the Houston Zoo. “We look forward to continuing to watch Joy and Shanti bond, and introducing her to Houston.”

2_Baby Elephant Joy Outside-0003-6833

3_Baby Elephant Joy Outside-0004-6921

4_Baby Elephant Joy Outside-0006-7012Photo Credits: Stephanie Adams/ Houston Zoo

The Asian Elephant (Elephas maximus) is the only living species of the genus Elephas and is native to Southeast Asia from India and Nepal in the west to Borneo in the east.

Since 1986, the species has been listed as “Endangered” by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). The population has declined by at least 50 percent over the last three generations. Primary threats are degradation, fragmentation, loss of habitat, and poaching.

*By visiting the Houston Zoo, guests help save baby elephants and their families in the wild. A portion of each zoo admission and membership goes straight to protecting an estimated 200-250 wild elephants in Asia.

Since the Houston Zoo started its work in Borneo in 2007, there has been a doubling of the elephant population on the island. The Houston Zoo also provides funds for elephant conservationist, Nurzhafarina “Farina” Othman and her team in Asia, to put tracking collars on wild elephants. This group uses collars to follow wild elephants, conducting valuable research that aids in protecting the elephants as they travel through the forests. Farina also spends time working with farmers that grow and produce palm oil, offering her guidance in responsible cultivation practices that are wildlife-friendly.

Palm oil is an ingredient in many foods and cosmetics, typically grown in areas that were previously home to animals like wild elephants. Converting pristine forests into oil palm plantations has caused extensive deforestation across Southeast Asia. Luckily, a growing number of producers are working to protect these areas and the animals that live there.

The Houston Zoo encourages people to protect elephants in the wild by supporting companies that use responsibly sourced palm oil, increasing demand for palm oil that is grown and produced without destroying the forested homes of elephants.

5_Baby Elephant Joy Outside-0007-7042

6_Baby Elephant Joy Outside-0008-7061

7_Baby Elephant Joy-0001-6296

8_Baby Elephant Joy-0002-6313

9_Baby Elephant Joy-0003-6322

10_Baby Elephant Joy-0004-6356

11_Baby Elephant Joy-0006-6395

[syndicated profile] zooborns_feed

Posted by Andrew Bleiman

1_zoo borns 3

The Northern Spotted Owl (NSO) is one of Canada’s most endangered species. Its entire Canadian range occurs in southwestern British Columbia.

Though historic estimates suggest that as many as 1,000 Spotted Owls occurred in the province pre-European settlement, currently fewer than 30 individuals remain in Canada, with more than half of those owls residing at the NSO Breeding Facility in Langley, BC.

The primary threat to Spotted Owls is habitat loss and fragmentation through industrial activities and human expansion. Additional threats include competition from the similar Barred Owl that has invaded the Spotted Owl’s range in recent decades.

2_zoo borns 2

3_chick d held

4_zoo borns 4Photo Credits: Northern Spotted Owl Breeding Centre

The NSO Breeding Program began in 2007 with a founding population of six adult Spotted Owls. There are currently 20 Spotted Owls residing at the breeding facility, including four breeding pairs.

As this is the first and only breeding program for this species in the world, the team has had to overcome challenges to better understand the behaviors and husbandry techniques required to successfully breed this species. The Program applies husbandry techniques such as: double clutching, artificial incubation, and hand rearing to increase the number of eggs produced and to give chicks the best chance for survival.

The Program's mission is to prevent this species from becoming extirpated from Canada by releasing captive-raised Spotted Owls back into habitat protected for the species in the province.

During the 2017 breeding season the NSO Team welcomed two chicks, Chick B and Chick D. Chick B is the first offspring for newly formed pair, Sally and Watson. Chick D is the second born to Scud and Shania. Both chicks are second-generation captive born Spotted Owls, which gives the Program confidence that captive born owls will be able to reproduce successfully.

Both chicks were artificially incubated for 32 days prior to hatching, which took an additional 85 hours! The chicks finally hatched on April 12 and April 19, 2017 and were hand raised before being returned to their parents.

The chicks have continued to grow more and more each day and left their nests in late May. As of July, the chicks are now able to fly all over their aviaries, but still rely on Mom and Dad to bring them food. They will be full grown and independent from their parents in the Fall, at which time they will undergo a routine veterinary exam and the team at the facility will find out if they are male or female.

5_zoo borns 5

6_zoo borns 6

Tiny New Pudu for Belfast Zoo

Jul. 17th, 2017 03:22 pm
[syndicated profile] zooborns_feed

Posted by Andrew Bleiman

(1)  Belfast Zoo keepers have said ‘hello deer’ to the latest arrival as the world’s smallest deer  the Southern pudu  has given birth!

Belfast Zoo keepers have said ‘hello deer’ to a new arrival as one of their Southern Pudu has given birth!

The latest arrival was born to father, Mr Tumnus, and mother, Susan, on June 18.

The Southern Pudu originates from the lowland forests of Southern Chile and Southwest Argentina and is the smallest member of the deer family! Adults measure only 43 centimeters in height when fully grown and, at birth, a fawn is so small that it weighs less than a bag of sugar.

(2)  The latest arrival was born to father  Mr Tumnus and mother  Susan on 18 June 2017.

(4) .  When fawns are born they are a light brown colour and their fur is covered with small white spots.  This helps the infant to camouflage in the undergrowth.Photo Credits: Belfast Zoo

Senior keeper, Allan Galway, said “Although small in size, our fawn is massively important to Belfast Zoo and to the European breeding programme for the Southern Pudu. The International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) considers this species to be vulnerable to the threat of extinction and numbers in the wild have dramatically declined in recent years due to loss of habitat through deforestation, hunting and predation.”

Allan continued, “We have been giving Susan and her new arrival some space to bond, so have not yet determined the sex of the new arrival or given the fawn a name. When fawns are born they are a light brown color, and their fur is covered with small white spots. This helps the infant to camouflage in the undergrowth especially when they are left alone while the mother feeds.”

Belfast Zoo’s Southern Pudu family share their home with some other South American “amigos” including: Southern Screamers and Red Howler Monkeys.

Belfast Zoo visitors can now experience a new reptile and amphibian house. Summer visitors can also witness daily feeding times, a new visitor photography base camp, the Adventurers’ Learning Centre and can visit all the latest zoo babies.

(3)  Adult Southern pudus measure only 43 centimetres in height when fully grown (pictured is father  Mr Tumnus)

[syndicated profile] stargateficrec_feed

Posted by ext_4078282

Show: SGA

Rec Category: Threesomes (Specifically, this month, Rodney/John/Radek stories)
Characters/Pairings: John Sheppard/Radek Zelenka, Rodney McKay/John Sheppard, Rodney McKay/Radek Zelenka, Rodney McKay/John Sheppard/Radek Zelenka
Categories: slash
Warnings: Nil
Author on LJ: sabinelagrande
Author's Website: See the AO3
Link: Results May Vary on AO3

Why This Must Be Read: This is sweet and hot and hilarious. Various encounters with mind-altering fruit or other Pegasus substances lead to a series of hook-ups, until the eventual, inevitable threesome. The writing's excellent, and I like the naturalness of the progression to them all being in a relationship. Radek's dry humor is excellent, and the way he and Rodney tag-team John is a hoot. Highly entertaining.


"Please relax," Radek urges him, his hand still on John's chest. John rests his own hand on top of it, looking up at him for a moment before turning to Rodney.

"I like his hair," he explains. "It's all crazy, like, I dunno, like he doesn't really give a shit. Like he gets up in the morning, and he's like," and John puffs himself up slightly, but he doesn't put on the ridiculous accent everyone else does when trying to imitate him, "'Fuck my hair, I got science to do.'"

"Maybe he's sobering up," Rodney deadpans, above John's head.

"But it's really fuckin' cute.
He's really fuckin' cute," he continues. "Pocket! That's what I meant. I wanna put him in my pocket. Don't tell him I said that."

"Dialing the gate," Ford says, and Radek is a little glad that John can't see it activate- otherwise, they'd have to sit here for twenty minutes so he could look at the pretty colors.

The med team Rodney's called for is waiting in the jumper bay, and John lets himself be maneuvered on to a stretcher without complaint.

"Carson!" John says emphatically. "Carson," he repeats, dropping his voice into a very serious whisper. "Carson, I am
really high."

"I know, Major," Carson replies, examining his pupils. "Let's get you to the infirmary."

"Can I bring Dr. Zelenka?' John asks, sounding like he's asking about his teddy bear.

When Carson looks over at him, Radek throws up his hands and shrugs. "Of course, lad," Carson assures him. "He's right here, see?"

"Yay," John says, reaching for Radek's hand again. "He's so cute," he whispers to Carson.

To Rodney's credit, he waits until Carson decides John's in no danger before he goes out into the hallway and dies laughing.



[syndicated profile] zooborns_feed

Posted by Andrew Bleiman

Image 1 - SZ Tree roo baby_WRS copy

Singapore Zoo is now home to one-tenth of the global population of endangered Goodfellow’s Tree Kangaroos under human care, with the arrival of a female joey.

Born jellybean-sized between July and August last year to mother Blue, the female joey first showed a limb in January this year, before peeking out her hairless head later that same month.

Image 2 - SZ Tree roo baby_WRS
Image 3 - SZ Tree roo baby_WRS
Image 4 - SZ Tree roo baby_WRSPhoto Credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore



As she approaches her one year milestone, the joey is gradually introducing herself to the world. Although a little clumsy when she first started exploring life outside her mother’s pouch, she can now be seen frequently honing her jumping and climbing skills. While she continues to pop in for mommy’s milk every now and then, she is more content to munch on favorites such as tapioca, carrot, corn, and beans.

With this birth, Singapore Zoo becomes the proud guardian of five Goodfellow’s Tree Kangaroos: four adults plus the new joey.

The Tree Kangaroos are managed under a Global Species Management Plan (GSMP). The plan involves coordinated efforts of participating zoos in Australia, Europe, Japan, North America, and Singapore to keep Goodfellow’s Tree Kangaroos as a genetically diverse assurance population should there be a catastrophic decline in the wild population.

Goodfellow’s Tree Kangaroos are native to the rain forests of New Guinea and Irian Jaya.  They feed mainly on leaves, and are listed as Endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List.

 

[syndicated profile] stargateficrec_feed

Posted by respoftw

Show: SGA

Rec Category: Kid Fic (of the 'they are parents' variety)
Characters: John Sheppard, Rodney McKay.
Pairings: McShep, past John/Elizabeth
Categories: Slash, past het
Warnings: Elizabeth is dead in this story, not sure that counts as needing a warning but...just to be safe!
Link: On Life and Living

Why This Must Be Read: I have a thing for kid fics, I make no bones about it. I generally prefer Rodney as the parent but this is one of two exceptions that prove that rule.

John is a widower, looking after his (very well written and likeable) daughter Kayla. During a trip to the science museum, they meet Dr Rodney McKay and...he basically never leaves their life after that. It's a very sweet set of fics, completely AU, set on Earth, no stargates whatsoever. Both John and Rodney are kept amazingly in character throughout which is always a challenge in AUs. Kayla is a great kid character and avoids the trap of being too perfect. One of my favourite things about this fic is that it shows both John and Rodney as fallible parents and feels very real.


They have lunch at the restaurant, which is more like a cafeteria than anything else. Rodney pays for everything even when John tells him he doesn't have to. The next stop is the gift shop, where Kayla would happily spend an hour at least. She looks at books, videos, stuffed animals, bath toys, magnets, sticker sets, and postcards until Rodney finally sighs and gives her a twenty dollar bill. "I don't care what you buy as long as I don't have to stand here and observe the process," he says, and goes outside in a huff.

John frowns. There are two employees in the gift shop, both middle aged women, and only a few other people shopping, but he can't leave Kayla in there on her own even though it's probably completely safe.

"Is Rodney mad?" she asks, coming over and taking John's hand. "I don't have to buy anything."

"No, it's okay," he says. "Go on and choose something, okay? Just try not to take too long."

"Okay." In a minute or two, Kayla settles on a pair of stuffed white Bengal tigers and pays for them, taking the change solemnly. They go outside, where Rodney is throwing little feed pellets for some ducks that have waddled over from the nearby pond display. "This one's for you," Kayla says, offering Rodney one of the little tigers.

Rodney swallows and slowly takes it. "Thanks," he says. The ducks quack and wander around in confusion, wondering where the food is, but Rodney isn't paying any attention to them. "Sorry," he mutters. "I guess I'm not very good at this."

"Hey, it's nice to know there's something you're not good at," John says.
[syndicated profile] zooborns_feed

Posted by Chris Eastland

First Wolf cub seen emerging from the den (photo credit Jackie Thomas) (4)

Cotswold Wildlife Park is celebrating the birth of a litter of five Eurasian Wolf cubs – the first to be born at the Park in its 47-year history.  

For the first ten days of their lives, the cubs were hidden from sight in one of the underground dens their parents, Ash and Ember, had excavated. One night, after a heavy downpour of rain, Ember took her cubs out of the birthing den and placed them above ground to stay dry. This was the first time anyone had seen the cubs. Both Ember and Ash are devoted first-time parents and keepers are delighted that the youngsters are healthy.

Wolf cubs  3 (photo credit Jackie Thomas)
Ember feeding cubs (photo Jackie Thomas)Photo Credit: Jackie Thomas (images 1-6), Cotswold Wildlife Park (images 7-15)

 

The births were unexpected for the Wolves’ care team.  Two-year old male Ash and three-year old female Ember arrived at the zoo just last year, and Wolves normally take a long time to form pair bonds. Additionally, females come into heat only once a year, between January and March.

Curator of Cotswold Wildlife Park Jamie Craig said, “Our Wolves are a new pairing and we did not really expect a successful breeding so soon. They have settled well and at present, everything with the adults and cubs is going to plan – we are keeping our fingers crossed that it continues but we have more confidence with every day that passes. The cubs will form an important nucleus to the ‘pack’ for the coming years.”

Wolves generally pair for life. Mating takes place in late winter or early spring. After a gestation period of approximately sixty-two days, the alpha female gives birth to a litter (usually between four and six cubs). At birth, the cubs are blind and deaf and are reliant on their parents for survival. After 11 to 15 days, their eyes open. Cubs develop rapidly under the watchful eye of their mother. At five weeks, the cubs are beginning to wean off their mother’s milk but cannot immediately fend for themselves and require considerable parental care and nourishment.

The Eurasian Wolf (Canis lupus) is one of the largest Wolf subspecies and the largest found outside of the Americas. There are almost 40 Wolf subspecies including Arctic Wolf, Tundra Wolf, critically endangered Red Wolf, Dingo and the domestic Dog.

See more photos and learn more about Eurasian Wolves below.

The Wolf was once the most widely distributed land mammal on the planet, except for humans. They were nearly eradicated in England by the 13th century. Wolves were destroyed in great numbers to protect the most important asset at that time – livestock (to which they were a constant threat). The Celts hunted Wolves in the third and fourth centuries B.C with the help of specially trained Irish Wolf Hounds. Later, Edgar the Peaceful created amnesty laws related to the Wolf: lawbreakers could pay their dues in Wolf heads. In 1560, King James VI declared that all men – no matter how old or young – participate in the hunt for Wolves. The probable date the Wolf became extinct in England was 1684. In central Europe, the battle against the Wolf took on a less frantic pace but in the first decade of the 20th Century, forty-eight states in Europe were already cleared of Wolves.

Thanks to dedicated conservation efforts, a small population of Eurasian Wolves has returned to the Alps. According to latest estimates, 36 packs and five pairs have been recorded in the Central European Lowlands.

At the milk bar (2) Photo credit Jackie Thomas
Ember with all five cubs (Credit Jackie Thomas)
Patient mum Ember (photo credit Jackie Thomas)
Wolf cubs 14
Wolf cubs 20 Ash with cub
Wolf cubs 5
Wolf cubs 6
Wolf cubs 6b
Wolf cubs 8
Wolf Cubs 9
Wolf cubs 15
Wolf cubs 21 parents with cub














[syndicated profile] zooborns_feed

Posted by Andrew Bleiman

2017_red_panda_cub_b2

The Binghamton Zoo at Ross Park is proud to announce the birth of twin Red Panda cubs on June 11 to second-time mother, Mei-Li.

The first cub has been with Mei-Li since birth and has grown as expected. The second cub was significantly smaller at birth, and after close observation, the decision was made to add supplemental feedings, hoping to allow the cub to stay with mom and sibling.

However, it became evident that the second cub was going to need additional care and support and was subsequently removed for hand rearing by Animal Care staff. This cub is now gaining weight appropriately, though additional health concerns have come to light. At this point, staff will be moving forward with the current care plan and will wait for the cub to become healthier before putting it back with Mei-Li.

2017_red_panda_cub_a2

2017_red_panda_cub_a1

2017_red_panda_cub_b1Photo Credits: Binghamton Zoo

The Red Panda (Ailurus fulgens) is listed as “Endangered” by the IUCN because its population has declined by 50% over the past 20 years. This decline is primarily due to deforestation, which eliminates red pandas’ nesting sites and sources of food. Through the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA), the Binghamton Zoo participates in several Species Survival Plans (SSP), ensuring the long-term health and survival of captive species, including the Red Panda.

Red Pandas can be found in the Himalayan Mountains in parts of Buma, Nepal, India, and China. Contrary to popular belief, Red Pandas are not related to the Giant Panda, but are closely related to the raccoon family.

Red Pandas spend most of their days sleeping in trees and are most active at nighttime. They are herbivores, eating berries, leaves, grains, nuts, fruits, flowers, and bird eggs.

Litter size ranges from one to four young. The young remain nest-bound for about 90 days after birth and reach their adult size at about 12 months. The maximum lifespan for Red Pandas is about 14 years.

According to Zoo staff, Cub A is on exhibit, but may not be visible for several weeks until it is big enough to climb out of the nest box. Cub B will continue to be off exhibit while under veterinary care.

The Zoo will soon host a gender reveal party and will be hosting a naming contest. Fans can also follow the growth of the Red Panda cubs via the Binghamton Zoo’s website: www.rossparkzoo.com/red-panda-cubs ​ ​

[syndicated profile] zooborns_feed

Posted by Andrew Bleiman

1_Gentoo Penguin chick at 21 days old credit Casey Phillips Tennessee Aquarium

It may only weigh a few pounds, but two of the biggest features of the Tennessee Aquarium’s newest Gentoo Penguin chick have already earned it an unofficial nickname.

Born on June 5 to experienced parents Bug and Big T., the large feet of the newest addition to Penguins’ Rock immediately inspired the moniker “Big Foot.”

“Our animal trainer Holly Gibson chose that name, and it is very fitting,” says Senior Aviculturist Loribeth Lee. “Besides his belly, the feet are the biggest thing on this guy right now! Penguin chicks have almost comically large feet until they grow into them. Having big feet helps Penguins to balance while they are so oddly shaped.”

This nickname is just a placeholder. It will be replaced by an official name, chosen from a crop of keeper-selected alternatives, during a public contest on the Aquarium’s Facebook page later this year.

2_The Gentoo Penguin chick at two days old credit Casey Phillips Tennessee Aquarium

3_Gentoo Penguin Chick at two days old credit Casey Phillips Tennessee Aquarium

4_Senior Aviculturist Loribeth Lee holds the new baby Gentoo Penguin credit Casey Phillips Tennessee AquariumPhoto Credits: Casey Phillips / Tennessee Aquarium

Aquarium staff began noticing signs that the new chick was breaking out of its egg, a process called “pipping,” at 8 a.m. on June 5. The baby Gentoo was fully hatched at 3:30 p.m., a faster-than-average pace, Lee says.

The chick’s gender will remain indeterminate until November, when it can be properly assessed by staff during the colony’s next round of semi-annual physical exams. A drop of the chick’s blood will be sent to a lab, and the DNA results will be available a few days later.

For now, the Aquarium’s Penguin experts are closely monitoring the chick’s growth and health, Lee says.

“The first four weeks of a chick’s life are the most concerning, as there are lots of obstacles to overcome,” she says. “We will continue to keep a close eye on this little bird, especially making sure the nest stays clean and the chick continues to get fed by both parents.”

Until the arrival of its waterproof adult feathers in six to seven weeks, the chick will remain safely corralled with its parents behind a clear, acrylic “play pen.” This barrier around the nest keeps nosey neighbors at flipper’s length away and prevents the baby Penguin from accidentally tumbling into the water.

Despite the uncertainty of this early period in its development, so far the chick has exhibited robust vitals and a healthy appetite. And it is gaining weight at a healthy rate, which indicates the chick’s body should start catching up with its enormous feet soon.

“We like to see the chicks on the higher end of the weight range, as if they do have a drop in weight at any point, then it is less critical than a bird who is on the low end of the weight range,” she says.

The chick’s parents, Bug and Big T., are one of the exhibit’s most prolific breeding pairs, having successfully hatched four chicks: Roxie, Bobber, Rodan and Terk. In all, the residents of Penguins’ Rock have hatched 20 chicks since 2009.

“Even after seeing over 20 chicks hatch here, it never gets old,” Lee says. “It’s so exciting to have a new young one in the group and watching our guests enjoy their progress! The best part of my job is seeing thriving birds in the exhibit, and this one seems to be doing well so far.”

The chick will reach its full, adult size when it is about 75 days old and its full adult weight a few months later after its swim muscles develop.

The Gentoo Penguin (Pygoscelis papua) is known for flamboyant red-orange beaks, white-feather caps, and peach-colored feet.

They populate the Antarctic Peninsula and numerous islands around the frozen continent. They are also the Penguin world’s third largest member, reaching a height of 30 inches and a weight of 12 pounds.

Partial to ice-free areas (including coastal plains, sheltered valleys, and cliffs), they gather in colonies of breeding pairs that can number from a few dozen to many thousands.

Gentoo numbers are noted to be increasing on the Antarctic Peninsula, but they have plummeted in some of their island enclaves, possibly due to pollution or disrupted fisheries. They are protected by the Antarctic Treaty of 1959 and were classified as “Near Threatened” by the IUCN in 2007.

Tennessee Aquarium guests can learn more and interact with experts during Penguin presentations at 10:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. each day. The public can also keep an eye on the chick’s growth over the coming weeks by watching the live Penguins’ Rock web cam at: http://www.tnaqua.org/animals-exhibits/penguins-rock-cam/

5_Gentoo Penguin chick being examined credit Casey Phillips Tennessee Aquarium

Lesson Learned, by JDJunkie (G)

Jul. 13th, 2017 05:47 pm
[syndicated profile] stargateficrec_feed

Posted by sg_fignewton

Show: SG-1

Rec Category: Teal'c and Daniel friendship
Characters: Teal'c, Daniel Jackson
Categories: fluff, gen
Warnings: none
Author on LJ: jdjunkie
Author's Website: JDJunkie at AO3
Link: Lesson Learned

Why This Must Be Read: This charming little ficlet is both metaphorically and literally sweet: a peaceful moment of friendship between Teal'c and Daniel, at the beginning.

And of course this one pushes all my happy buttons, because JDJunkie wrote it at my request. :)


This world. Earth's. His world, and now Teal'c's.
[syndicated profile] zooborns_feed

Posted by Andrew Bleiman

1_Wyoming toad - Jennie Miller

The Detroit Zoological Society’s (DZS) conservation breeding program for the Wyoming Toad continues to make strides for this federally endangered amphibian. Seven hundred tadpoles have been produced in the Detroit Zoo’s National Amphibian Conservation Center and were scheduled to be shipped to Wyoming on July 5 for eventual release into the wild.

“It’s exciting to share our continued success with this program. We’ve had recording-breaking years in the past and are committed to ensuring the survival of this species as well as many others,” said Scott Carter, DZS chief life sciences officer. “Amphibians are the most endangered animals in the world, with more than 40 percent of all species at risk.”

The tadpoles were scheduled to be released into a protected Wyoming wetland in the Laramie Basin, where they will hopefully metamorphose into toadlets. The metamorphosis usually occurs in mid-July, and takes approximately four to five weeks.

Wyoming tadpoles 1 - Jennie Miller

Wyoming tadpoles 2 - Jennie Miller

Wyoming tadpoles 3 - Jennie MillerPhoto Credits: Jennie Miller / Detroit Zoo

The Wyoming Toad (Anaxyrus baxteri) is a dark brown, gray or greenish amphibian with small, dark blotches. The average length is 2.2 inches, with the females slightly larger than the males.

Once abundant in the wetlands and irrigated meadows of Wyoming’s southeastern plains, the Wyoming Toad was listed as extinct in 1994, meaning populations are no longer producing offspring that survive to adulthood in the wild. The cause of the decline is not well understood, but it is likely that more than one factor contributed to the situation in the past, with habitat loss and infectious diseases suspected as major drivers.

In 2007, the DZS’s collaborative breeding program for the Wyoming Toad was “No.1” on the Association of Zoos & Aquariums’ list of the Top 10 wildlife conservation success stories. The breeding partnership has successfully released more than 8,000 tadpoles, toadlets and toads in Wyoming since the program’s inception in 1995. Once released, these latest tadpoles should add to that number.

The National Amphibian Conservation Center opened at the Detroit Zoo in 2000 and was distinguished as the first major conservation facility dedicated entirely to conserving and exhibiting amphibians. It houses a spectacular diversity of frogs, toads, salamanders, newts and caecilians – including the Wyoming Toad. Dubbed “Disneyland for toads” by The Wall Street Journal, this award winning, state-of-the-art facility is world renowned for amphibian conservation, care, exhibition and research.

[syndicated profile] zooborns_feed

Posted by Andrew Bleiman

1_NEW Puma Cub 2017

The Minnesota Zoo is excited to welcome a new male Puma kitten, named Landslide, to their Medtronic Minnesota Trail exhibit.

“We are excited about giving our guests a chance to see this energetic young male Puma kitten on the Minnesota Trail,” says Tom Ness, curator for the Tropics and Medtronic Minnesota Trails. “We take our mission to save wildlife very seriously here at the Minnesota Zoo and we are so grateful we are able to provide him with a great home.”

The male Puma kitten was found orphaned after a landslide in NE Washington earlier this spring and was initially cared for by the Oregon Zoo. He made the journey to his new home at the Minnesota Zoo in early May, and Zoo veterinarians have been caring for the kitten behind the scenes to ensure he is healthy and stable. The young Puma was scheduled to finish his last round of kitten vaccines last week, and vet staff and zookeepers report he is thriving in his new home.

2_image2

3_image3

4_image1Photo Credits: Tyler Birschbach/Minnesota Zoo

This is the second successful Puma (kitten) public debut for the Minnesota Zoo this year. An older Puma, named Sequim, that was also orphaned and rescued as a young kitten outside the Port Angeles, Washington area, made his public debut along the Medtronic Minnesota Trail earlier this year. The Medtronic Minnesota Trail is also home to several other rescued animals such as: three Black Bears, five Gray Wolves, a Bald Eagle, a Porcupine and more.

The young Puma will be on-exhibit daily from 9 am until approximately 1 pm. He will rotate exhibit time with Sequim.

Puma is a genus in Felidae (Felis concolor). Probably due to their wide range across North and South America, Pumas have multiple names they are known by, including Cougar and Mountain Lion.

Pumas can run up to 43 mph, jump more than 20 feet from standing, and leap up to 16 feet straight up.

Although they can make a wide range of cat noises (hisses, growls, purrs), Pumas cannot roar. Instead, they are known for their distinctive “scream-like” calls during mating, but are often extremely stealthy and go unheard.

Although they have been pushed into smaller habitats by human settlement expansion, members of this genus have been formally classified as “Least Concern” by the IUCN. Their success in the wild, thus far, is due to their adaptation to changing habitat conditions.

[syndicated profile] zooborns_feed

Posted by Andrew Bleiman

1_Langur1

It’s a birth for the record books at the Memphis Zoo! A male François’ Langur was born to mom, Tanah, and dad, Jay Jay, on April 12.

According to the François’ Langur Species Survival Plan (SSP), the leading authority on the total François’ Langur population, 22-year-old Tanah is the oldest Langur in captivity to give birth. In honor of this record-breaking fact, the new infant has been named Ripley...a nod to the quintessential purveyor of amazing facts: “Ripley’s Believe It or Not!”.

“This is our third François' Langur birth in three years,” said Courtney Janney, Curator of Large Mammals. “These animals live in social groups, and their young are raised communally. Tanah is taking very good care of him, but sisters Jean Grey and Raven spend a lot of time helping out by carrying him around!”

2_Langur4

4_Langur3Photo Credits: Greg James / Memphis Zoo

Visitors to the Memphis Zoo’s François’ Langur exhibit will be able to spot little Ripley quite easily. When they’re born, Langur infants are bright orange. As they get older, their orange slowly fades into the black coat that all adults have.

Ripley and his parents are currently on exhibit, along with sisters: Raven, Rook, and Jean Grey.

The François' Langur (Trachypithecus francoisi), also known as the Francois' Leaf Monkey, Tonkin Leaf Monkey, or White Side-burned Black Langur, is a species of lutung belonging to the Colobinae subfamily.

The species is a native of Southwestern China to northeastern Vietnam. The species is named after Auguste François (1857–1935), who was the French Consul at Lungchow in southern China.

The François' Langur is currently classified as “Endangered” on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. The population has been on a steady decline for the past 30 years. Of the many factors threatening their survival, hunting has had the largest impact.

The Memphis Zoo has housed François’ Langurs since 2002.

3_Langur2

[syndicated profile] zooborns_feed

Posted by Chris Eastland

Kitani's calf was the first of the two rare rhinos to be born at Chester Zoo in a week (22)

Two rare Eastern Black Rhino calves were born within days of each other at the Chester Zoo, boosting global numbers of the Critically Endangered species.

The new mothers, Kitani and Zuri, delivered their babies on June 19 and June 26 after 15-month-long pregnancies. The babies were delivered safely onto soft sand.

Kitani's calf was the first of the two rare rhinos to be born at Chester Zoo in a week (27)
Zuri's calf was the second of two rare rhinos to be born at Chester Zoo in just a week (10)Photo Credit:  Chester Zoo

Video footage shows Kitani spinning around as she delivers her calf. The youngster was on its feet within a few minutes of birth, and took its first wobbly steps as amazed zoo visitors watched.

Both calves are doing well, and Kitani and Zuri are excellent mothers, according to their care team at Chester Zoo.

Less than 650 Eastern Black Rhinos now remain across Africa, and the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) lists the animals as Critically Endangered in the wild.

The two births are a boost for the endangered species breeding program for Eastern Black Rhinos, which are teetering on the brink of extinction in the wild. Zoo births are managed to retain the highest level of genetic diversity as a hedge against possible extinction in the wild.

In addition, knowledge obtained from the zoo’s Rhino breeding program is being used right now in Africa to boost conservation efforts in the field.  

A huge surge in illegal poaching, driven by a global increase in demand for Rhino horn to supply the traditional Asian medicine market, resulted in around 95% of Rhinos being wiped out since the turn of the 20th century. 2014 was branded ‘the worst poaching year on record’ by leading conservationists after more than 1,200 Rhinos were hunted in South Africa alone - a 9,000% increase from 2007.

The issue is being driven by the street value of Rhino horn, which sells for more per gram than gold or cocaine, although modern science has proven it completely useless for medicinal purposes.  Rhino horn is made from keratin – the same material as human hair and nails.



See more photos of the calves below.

Kitani's calf was the first of the two rare rhinos to be born at Chester Zoo in a week (29)
Kitani's calf was the first of the two rare rhinos to be born at Chester Zoo in a week (35)
Zuri's calf was the second of two rare rhinos to be born at Chester Zoo in just a week (15)
Zuri's calf was the second of two rare rhinos to be born at Chester Zoo in just a week (14)
Zuri's calf was the second of two rare rhinos to be born at Chester Zoo in just a week (6)







Marking Time by Redbyrd (PG)

Jul. 8th, 2017 09:09 pm
[syndicated profile] stargateficrec_feed

Posted by ext_4091985

Show: SG-1

Rec Category: Gen
Characters: Daniel Jackson, Teal’c, Sam Carter, Jack O’Neill, Lou Ferretti, Various SGC Personnel
Categories: Gen, Episode Related, Drama
Warnings: None
Author on LJ: redbyrd_sgfic
Author’s Website: Redbyrd’s Stargate Fanfiction
Link: Marking Time

Why This Must Be Read: Redbyrd's website is a treasure trove of beautifully written gen fic. Marking Time is an amazing extension of what Daniel and the rest of the team and SGC were up to during A Hundred Days while Jack was stuck on Edora. I particularly love the well-rendered SGC military personnel and Daniel fitting himself into other SG teams in true anthropologist fashion.

Daniel Jackson stood in the hold of the Air Force cargo plane and listened attentively to the instructions that Jack was giving over the noise of the engines. 'Never a dull moment in this business.' He never thought when he'd learned to skydive that he'd ever be using it on the job. Then again, he had possibly the most unpredictable job in the universe. He should be expecting the unexpected by now. He wished he didn't know exactly how dangerous this was. They were at 7000 feet and just under the clouds. There was a brisk crosswind blowing and it looked like it could snow at any moment. A far cry from the sunny July day he'd first done this at the Air Force Academy.


[syndicated profile] zooborns_feed

Posted by Chris Eastland

19732312_1494362457289945_8260157228210158814_n

Five fluffy Cheetah cubs made their public debut this week at Australia’s Monarto Zoo.

Born in March to mother Kesho, the cubs immediately began exploring their new environment after bonding with Kesho in a private den for about three months.

One of the cubs is a male, and the other four are females. They each weigh about 15 pounds and are described as “very adventurous.”

19437405_1486272208098970_8089627607465356222_nPhoto Credit:  Adrian Mann (1); Monarto Zoo (2)

The prospect of adding four potential breeding females to the Cheetah population is thrilling for the Monarto Zoo staff. Cheetahs are listed as Vulnerable to Extinction by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List.

Only about 6,700 Cheetahs remain in the wild, primarily in eastern and southwestern Africa, half of what it was 35 years ago.  As their habitats are fragmented into smaller pieces by the expansion of farms, grazing lands, and cities, the Cats have less space to roam and less prey to eat. Cheetahs are also killed by ranchers who fear that the cats are killing their livestock.

Breeding programs, like those at Monarto Zoo and other zoos around the world, offer hope for the future. Animals are carefully matched based on their “pedigree” or genetic background, with the goal of maintaining a high level of genetic diversity in Cheetahs under human care.

 

[syndicated profile] zooborns_feed

Posted by Chris Eastland

1_ZooMiamiWharthogs

Zoo Miami is proud to announce the birth of four African Warthogs! Three males and one female were born on June 20th.

Zoo staff were recently able to separate the mother from her newborns for a few minutes to perform a neonatal exam on each of them. The quick exam confirmed their sex and helped to insure that they have an excellent start in life. The preliminary reports indicate that all four piglets appear to be healthy and developing well.

The three-year-old mother, Erica, is from the Indianapolis Zoo, and the three-year-old father, Beebop, was born at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park. These are the first offspring for both parents, but it is the second successful birth of Warthogs at Zoo Miami. The Zoo’s first birth occurred in 1995.

The mother will remain off-exhibit with her piglets for several days to insure that they have bonded properly and are well acclimated to their surroundings prior to going on public display.

3_ZooMiamiWharthogs

2_ZooMiamiWharthogs

4_ZooMiamiWharthogsPhoto Credits: Zoo Miami/Ron Magill

Warthogs (Phacochoerus africanus) are found through much of sub-Saharan Africa. Though not naturally aggressive, these wild pigs are quite capable of protecting themselves with large, powerful tusks, which they normally use to tear up the ground in search of roots and grubs and to establish dominance between them. Males develop considerably larger tusks than the females.

The name “warthog” is a bit misleading; the protrusions that come out of the sides of their head are not actual warts, but rather fatty, granular tissue.

Though warthogs appear ferocious, they are basically grazers. They eat grasses and plants, and also use their snouts to dig or “root” for roots or bulbs. When startled or threatened, Warthogs can be surprisingly fast, running at speeds of up to 30 miles an hour.

The African Warthog is currently classified as “Least Concern” by the IUCN. However, the species is susceptible to drought and hunting. The Warthog is currently present in numerous protected areas across its range.

5_ZooMiamiWharthogsZookeeper Will Montiel proudly holds a newborn warthog getting ready for its neonatal exam:

6_ZooMiamiWharthogs

[syndicated profile] zooborns_feed

Posted by Andrew Bleiman

1_rosenroter_flamingo_ZO50710

This year, even more pages are being added to the Flamingos’ success story at Zoo Basel. Thirty pink chicks have once again hatched in the zoo’s Flamingo enclosure.

Flamingos (Phoenicopterus roseus) are a permanent feature in Zoo Basel, and have been since 1879! The first Flamingo chick hatched there in 1958. Since then, the zoo has successfully bred over 500 Flamingos. Zoo Basel is one of the world’s leading zoos for Flamingo breeding.

2_rosenroter_flamingo_ZO50949

3_rosenroter_flamingo_ZO50733

4_rosenroter_flamingo_ZO50993Photo Credits: Zoo Basel

This year is a hugely successful one. Of the 120 adult birds at the zoo, approximately 90 participated in the breeding activities. About 30 chicks have already hatched, and there is a good chance that more will still follow.

Visitors to Zoo Basel’s spacious Flamingo enclosure will instantly notice two things about them: they are pink and have long legs. However, if you look closer, you will also notice that their bills are bent. This is an ingenious form of natural evolution that is totally unique to these birds.

If you watch the flamingos when they eat, the reason for their bent bills becomes clear. They are dipped into the water ‘in reverse’ (upper bill first) and swung back and forth. Lamellae with fine hairs, that work somewhat like the whalebones of baleen whales, are found on the lower and upper jaw. As a Flamingo moves its slightly open upper bill back and forth in the water, it also moves its tongue back and forth like a pump. This drives the water, together with the tiny food particles it contains, into the bill. As the tongue presses forwards again, the bill is closed slightly. The water runs along the lamellae out of the bill, and the food particles get stuck on the fine hairs. Fine papillae on the palate and tongue then transport the food on towards the stomach. This process takes place so quickly that all onlookers will see is the splashing of water around the curved bill. The tongue pumps water in and out up to five times per second.

Unlike adult Flamingos, newly hatched chicks have a very straight and small bill. In their first few days of life, the chicks are entirely dependent on their parents’ crop milk, a milky, slightly reddish juice produced in the cells of the upper digestive tract. Both parents produce this milk and feed their chick. At eight days of age, the chicks start to search for food in the water. With their straight bills, however, they are unable to catch a great deal of food and instead pick at the mud or make circular motions in the water. Only at about two months of age do Flamingos’ bills start to bend. The young birds refine their technique and start to search for food independently.

Flamingos’ curved bills are the result of their adaptation to an otherwise inhospitable habitat. They specialize in living in salt-water lakes and lagoons, where they primarily eat saline crabs, mosquito larvae, tiny insects and algae.

5_rosenroter_flamingo_ZO50966

6_rosenroter_flamingo_ZOB1338

7_rosenroter_flamingo_ZOB0425

Profile

kutsuwamushi: (Default)
kutsuwamushi

July 2017

S M T W T F S
      1
2 34 5678
91011121314 15
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031     

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jul. 20th, 2017 04:31 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios