[syndicated profile] zooborns_feed

Posted by Andrew Bleiman

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A female Southern White Rhino calf, born April 30 to first-time mother Kiazi and father Maoto, curiously checked out her surroundings May 18 at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, under the watchful eye of her attentive mother.

Kiazi’s pregnancy was very exciting for researchers at the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research. She arrived at the Safari Park in 2008 and, despite breeding regularly since her arrival, she had never before conceived. At 16 years old, she is past the average age that most female Southern White Rhinos have their first calf.

“The birth of Kiazi’s calf gives us a great deal of hope that by feeding low phytoestrogens at our institution and others, we can once again have a healthy, self-sustaining captive Southern White Rhinoceros population,” said Christopher Tubbs, Ph.D., a senior scientist in Reproductive Sciences at the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research. “With the high level of poaching currently happening in Africa, having a healthy ex situ population of Rhinos is as important as ever. This calf is an example of how we are using cutting-edge laboratory science to lead the fight against extinction.”

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4_SWRhino96th_003_Med-1024x683Photo Credits: San Diego Zoo Safari Park

Tubbs and his colleagues have been working for nine years to determine why Southern White Rhino females born in zoos tend not to bear offspring as often as their wild relatives. This problem is not found in other species of Rhinos living in zoos. Through extensive research, it was discovered that the animals might be sensitive to compounds called phytoestrogens found in soy and alfalfa, which are a component of the animals’ diets in zoos. During their 16-month gestation, female calves could be exposed to the compounds through their mother’s diet, resulting in infertility issues later in their life.

On the basis of these findings, the nutritional services team at San Diego Zoo Global changed the diet for Southern White Rhinos in 2014. First, they reduced the amount of pellets rich with soy and alfalfa that are fed to the Rhinos. Next, they developed a grass-based pellet for the Rhinos that is low in phytoestrogen and supplies nutrients to support reproduction. Approximately two years after the diet changes, two females became pregnant. Since then, there have been three pregnancies in females that had not successfully reproduced before, which resulted in the birth of two healthy calves.

Although Tubbs and his team have only focused on the potential effects of dietary phytoestrogens in White Rhinos, it is likely that a number of species living in zoo settings receive diets containing levels of phytoestrogens capable of affecting reproduction. Therefore, future research efforts will focus on identifying species that are possibly affected, evaluating their sensitivity to phytoestrogens and, if warranted, developing new diets and feeding practices aimed at enhancing fertility.

The research project has reached a real point of urgency, due to the increase in poaching in recent years that has dramatically affected Rhino populations in the wild. When the project began in 2007, 13 Rhinos were poached (that year). In 2016, 1,054 Southern White Rhinos were poached in South Africa—with an average of three Rhinos killed every day. There are five species of Rhinos, with three of those species—Black, Javan and Sumatran—listed as “Critically Endangered” on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species. The Greater One-horned Rhino is listed as “Vulnerable” and the Southern White Rhino is listed as “Near Threatened”.

Kiazi’s calf is the 96th Southern White Rhino calf born at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park since 1972. Estimated to weigh around 125 pounds at birth, the calf will nurse from her mother for up to 14 months. She is expected to gain about 100 pounds a month in her first year. When full grown, at around 3 years of age, she could weigh 4,000 to 5,000 pounds. The Rhino calf and her mom can best be seen roaming their habitat from the Park’s Africa Tram Safari or a Caravan Safari.

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Posted by Andrew Bleiman

Leopardcubs1

Utah's Hogle Zoo is pleased to introduce their new Amur Leopard cubs, Rafferty and Roman!

The cubs were born February 17 and have been bonding with mom, Zeya, behind the scenes, learning all the basics of being an Amur Leopard. Rafferty’s name means “one who possess prosperity”, and Roman means “strong, powerful”.

According to keepers, Zeya is doing a great job nurturing her little duo and is fiercely protective of the boys. At their recent check-up, Rafferty and Roman clocked in at 12 and 13 pounds and are now ready to meet Zoo guests!

Hogle Zoo is thrilled to contribute to the population of this critically endangered species. Experts estimate only 60 Amur Leopards remain in the wild.

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Rafferty RomanPhoto Credits: Utah's Hogle Zoo

The Amur Leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis) is a subspecies native to the Primorye region of southeastern Russia and the Jilin Province of northeast China. The Amur Leopard is also known as the “Far Eastern Leopard”.

Amur Leopards are threatened by: poaching, encroaching civilization, new roads, poaching of their prey, forest fires, inbreeding, possible coexisting with disease carriers and transmitters, and exploitation of forests.

Due to the small number of reproducing Amur Leopards in the wild, the gene pool is so reduced that the population is also at risk from inbreeding depression.

The Amur Leopard is known as the most endangered of all Leopard subspecies. It is currently listed as “Critically Endangered” on the IUCN Red List. In 2007, only 19–26 wild Amur Leopards were estimated to have survived, and as of 2015, fewer than 60 individuals are estimated to survive in Russia and China.

According to the IUCN’s latest report, “Although the population of P. p. orientalis may have increased recently, especially on the Chinese side of the border (Xiao et al. 2014), the total population remains <60 individuals. With no noted population or range increase, the Sri Lankan Leopard (P. p. kotiya) should retain its current status as Endangered. The Leopard of southwestern Asia (P. p. saxicolor or ciscaucasica) has been recorded in previously undocumented areas of the Caucasus, such as Georgia and Azerbajian (Sarukhanova 2014, Voskyanyan 2014), however, due to overall low numbers and restricted range, this subspecies should remain listed as Endangered (Khorozyan 2008).”

June reccers: volunteer post

May. 24th, 2017 03:22 pm
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Posted by sg_fignewton

This entry will be open to volunteers through May 31st. The official list of monthly reccers will be posted on Monday.

Comment with the username you'll be using to rec and the category you want, choosing a category from the list below or selecting a more rare category that has been used in the past. If you want to rec a category that is not on the list below or in the community memories, feel free to ask. Remember that you may volunteer for a category that isn't listed.

By signing up, you are committing yourself to reccing at least two (preferably four) stories in that category during the month of June. May reccers may only sign up for next month after posting their minimum two recs for this month. The FAQ and rec template, with detailed instructions, can be found here.

You must be a member of stargateficrec in order to post, so if you're a new reccer, be sure to join the community. If you are using OpenID via Dreamwidth, please get in touch with me at my e-mail, so I can walk you through the procedure of joining the comm.

Genre

Humor
Drama
Crossover
Alternate Universe
Team
Episode Related
SGU
Slash
Het
Gen
Other (specify)


Pairings

John/Teyla
John/Rodney
Elizabeth/John
Daniel/Janet
Daniel/Vala
Janet/Sam
Jack/Daniel
Jack/Sam
Sam/Rodney
Other (specify)

Friendship

Jack and Sam
Jack and Daniel
John and Rodney
Sam and Janet
John and Elizabeth
Daniel and Sam
Elizabeth and Teyla
Carson and Rodney
Other (specify)

Character

Teyla Emmagen
Elizabeth Weir
John Sheppard
Rodney McKay
Cameron Mitchell
Jonas Quinn
Ronon Dex
Aiden Ford
Janet Fraiser
Teal'c
Samantha Carter
Daniel Jackson
Jack O'Neill
Vala Mal Doran
Evan Lorne
General Hammond
Carson Beckett
Other (specify)

Remember: first come, first claimed.

Important: Less than 5% of those watching the comm responded to our where do we go from here poll. If you have not yet done so, please take a minute to express your opinion. It's important to us that we get a good idea of what most of the fans here would prefer.
[syndicated profile] zooborns_feed

Posted by Andrew Bleiman

Spiny hill turtle 2 (c) ZSL

A tiny turtle made a timely debut on May 15 at ZSL London Zoo. Not only was the Spiny Hill Turtle hatchling the first ever of its kind to hatch at the Zoo, it arrived just in time for World Turtle Day on May 23*.

After keeping a close eye on the egg during its 136 day incubation period, keepers managed to capture the ‘cracking’ moment the endangered Spiny Hill Turtle came out of its shell, on a time lapse camera.

ZSL keeper, Francesca Servini, said, “The reptile team have spent four years carefully researching this fascinating turtle species so we’re very excited to have our first ever hatch at ZSL London Zoo – just in time for World Turtle Day.”

“The hatchling used its special egg-tooth to break the shell’s surface early in the morning, and it took 36 hours to completely push its way out. The egg-tooth, which is a tiny sharp white bump on the turtle’s head, will soon fall off now its job is done.”

The turtle weighed a tiny 33g at birth and measured just 61mm, although it will eventually grow to approximately 27cm in size.

Spiny hill turtle (c) ZSLPhoto Credits: ZSL London Zoo

The Spiny Hill Turtle (Heosemys spinosa) is native to lowland and hill rainforests, usually in the vicinity of small streams, from Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand.

The unusual spiny shell spikes that give the turtles their name are used to deter predators and provide camouflage among their forest floor homes.

The Spiny Hill Turtle has been classified as “Endangered” on the IUCN Red List. According to the IUCN: “…known trade volumes of the species have declined by about 50% in Indonesia recently despite high demand in the food trade. It is restricted to small and isolated populations over much of its range, although there is a lack of data for some areas.”

ZSL London Zoo is honored to be a part of the work being done to save this endangered species. According to a Zoo spokesperson, “It has been estimated that more than ten million turtles are being traded for food, traditional medicine and the pet trade each year in Asia, where this turtle originates. The husbandry research being carried out here at ZSL London Zoo is becoming increasingly important in guaranteeing the existence of these animals for the future.”

*American Tortoise Rescue (ATR), a nonprofit organization established in 1990 for the protection of all species of tortoise and turtle, is celebrating its 17th annual World Turtle Day® on May 23rd. The day was created by ATR to celebrate and protect turtles and tortoises and their disappearing habitats around the world. Now celebrated around the globe, turtle and tortoise lovers are taking “shellfies” and holding “shellebrations” in the US, Canada, Pakistan, Borneo, India, Australia, the UK and many other countries.

ATR launched World Turtle Day to increase respect and knowledge for the world’s oldest creatures. These gentle animals have been around for 200 million years, yet they are rapidly disappearing as a result of smuggling, the exotic food industry, habitat destruction, global warming and the cruel pet trade. It is a very sad time for turtles and tortoises of the world.

For more information about American Tortoise Rescue and World Turtle Day, see their website: www.worldturtleday.org

Earth Day Birth-Day for Tamandua Pup

May. 22nd, 2017 06:05 pm
[syndicated profile] zooborns_feed

Posted by Andrew Bleiman

Terra 300 dpi

Reid Park Zoo celebrated a special arrival on April 22. A female Tamandua arrived on “Earth Day”, and in honor of the baby’s special birthday, she has been named Terra (Latin for “the planet earth”).

Reid Park Zoo is working in partnership with the Southern Tamandua SSP to place several of its Tamanduas, and to continue the Zoo’s breeding based upon the SSP recommendations. Reid Park Zoo’s Education Supervisor, Jennifer Stoddard, is also an education adviser for this vital program.

Though not on exhibit, the Zoo’s Tamanduas make regular appearances during education programs and formal presentations. They can also been seen going for informal walks, with the animal care staff, on zoo grounds.

Terra teddy 300 dpiPhoto Credits: Reid Park Zoo (Image 1: pup at one-month-old/ Image 2: two-weeks-old) 

The Southern Tamandua (Tamandua tetradactyla), also known as the “Collared Anteater” or “Lesser Anteater”, is a species of anteater from South America. It is native to Venezuela, Trinidad, northern Argentina, southern Brazil, and Uruguay at elevations to 1,600 m (5,200 ft.).

It is a solitary animal, found in many habitats from mature to secondary forests and arid savannas. It feeds on ants, termites, and bees. Its very strong fore claws can be used to break insect nests or to defend itself.

Mating generally takes place in the fall. Gestation ranges from 130 to 190 days, and usually one young is born. At birth, the young does not resemble its parents, its coat varies from white to black. The pup will ride on the mother's back for some time.

The species is currently classified as “Least Concern” on the IUCN Red List. Their main threat is being killed by hunters. Some hunters pursue the species with claims that the Tamanduas kill domestic dogs. They are also killed for the thick tendons in their tails, from which rope is made, and Tamanduas are sometimes used by Amazonian Indians as “organic” bug control in an effort to rid their homes of ants and termites.

Curl Up With Pallina the Armadillo

May. 21st, 2017 05:49 am
[syndicated profile] zooborns_feed

Posted by Chris Eastland

18403793_10155113573430479_1479412469551318350_oWhen a Southern Three-banded Armadillo was born at the Cincinnati Zoo this spring, keepers selected a fitting name for the golf-ball-sized female: Pallina, which happens to be the name of the small white ball in a bocce set. 

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34211244662_824faca4a5_oPhoto Credits: DJJam Photo (1), Cassandre Crawford (2,3)

Within a month of her birth on February 28, Pallina more than quadrupled her weight – the equivalent of a seven-pound newborn human weighing 32 pounds at one month of age!


Pallina is the first offspring for parents Lil and Titan and the first Armadillo born at the zoo since 2011. 

Armadillos are known for their ability to curl into a ball, using their hard outer shell to protect their face and soft underside.  The outer “armor” is made of keratin, the same material that makes up your fingernails. Southern Three-banded Armadillos are native to South America, where they inhabit parts of Argentina, Paraguay, Bolivia, and Brazil and feed on a variety of insects. 

Southern Three-banded Armadillos are listed as Near Threatened by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Primary threats include habitat destruction as native grasslands are converted to farms. Hunting and capture for the pet trade also contribute to the Armadillos' decline.

 

Advantage (by Resonant) (E)

May. 21st, 2017 03:51 am
[syndicated profile] stargateficrec_feed

Posted by ext_4078282

Show: SGA

Rec Category: Slavefic
Characters: Rodney McKay/John Sheppard
Categories: slash
Warnings: dubcon, being slavefic, but see the notes below
Author on LJ: resonant
Author's Website: See the AO3
Link: Advantage on AO3

Why This Must Be Read: Everyone will already know this one of course, but it was last reccd here 12 years ago, the link wasn't to the AO3, and it just has to be in a set of slavefic recs. :) This is also a tribute as 'Advantage' was my gateway drug into SGA fandom, especially to McShep. It's definitely slavefic but with a wonderful take on the trope, and it's by turns hilarious, touching, and hot. John's accidentally enslaved to Rodney off-world (like you get), but the fic is about Rodney trying very hard - first to ignore John's enslavement, and then trying hard not to be a dick about it (with patchy results - this is Rodney, after all). Along the way there's a massive amount of snark, romance, and even some action. Run, don't walk, if you've never read it, and if you have, time for a re-read! It's a classic.

(There are two podfic versions as a bonus as well, by me and dodi )


"And so we got nowhere, revealed our presence, and showed them the gate and the jumper for nothing, and now Major Sheppard thinks he's my slave, and just please, please tell me you can undo this, Carson, because I can't have him tagging after me like an oversized kid brother --"

"Hey," Sheppard said irritably.

"He seems all right," Elizabeth said.

"Major?" Rodney tossed him three of the very delicious khama nuts that were the one and only good thing to come of this trip. "Here. Juggle."

"I can't juggle," Sheppard said, sending two of them flying at once. "Never had the knack," he went on as the third one joined them, three perfect parabolas, over and over.

Elizabeth glanced at Rodney and back at Sheppard. "Looks like you can," she said.

"No, no, I've tried," Sheppard said, still tossing nuts. "I always drop them."

For a long moment they all watched Sheppard juggle, and then Rodney said, "You can quit any time you want."

"OK," Sheppard said. "Hey, cool, watch this," and he switched to a circle pattern. "Toss me another one." He caught it in midair and sent it flying with the rest.

"So, hey," Rodney said, "you can do impossible things if I tell you to? Go walk on the ceiling."

Sheppard gave him a look of withering scorn. "Right."

"At least it doesn't seem to have affected his personality," Elizabeth said.


Tube-nosed Bats Get a Helping Hand

May. 20th, 2017 01:38 pm
[syndicated profile] zooborns_feed

Posted by Andrew Bleiman

2E4C9039 TWWith huge eyes, spotted wings, and tubular nostrils, Eastern Tube-nosed Bats are a unique and fascinating Australian Fruit Bat species.  Two of these little Bats are currently being cared for at the Australian Bat Clinic.

Screenshot 2017-05-06 16.21.26
Screenshot 2017-05-06 16.21.20Photo Credit: Rachael Wasiak/Wakaleo


Video Credit:  Adam Cox/Wakaleo

The two Bats were injured in the wild and brought to the Clinic. One of the Bats was attacked by a Kookaburra, and the other was caught in barbed wire. Once the Bats recover from their injuries, they will be released back into the wild.

It’s rare for humans to encounter these Bats, because they are shy and extremely well-camouflaged.  As fruit-eaters, Tube-nosed Bats disperse the seeds of many native and exotic fruiting trees, including fig trees.

Eastern Tube-nosed Bats live in forests along Australia’s northeastern coast.

Tube-nosed hanging 1
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[syndicated profile] zooborns_feed

Posted by Andrew Bleiman

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A Bornean Orangutan was born on December 5 at Zoo Krefeld, in Germany.

Proud mother, Lea, welcomed the lovely female infant. Because of the baby’s beautiful orange-red coloring, keepers decided to name her Suria, from the Malay (Sanskrit) word for “sun”.

Suria is the third infant born to Lea, and her older brother, Changi, has embraced the presence of his new sibling.

Although Suria is beginning to explore her exhibit, she still prefers to cling to the safety of her mother, as can be seen in these amazing images captured by photographer, Arjan Haverkamp.

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4_34126394090_f419fe381a_kPhoto Credits: Arjan Haverkamp

The Bornean Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) is a species of Orangutan native to the island of Borneo. Together with the Sumatran Orangutan, it belongs to the only genus of great apes native to Asia. Like other great apes, Orangutans are highly intelligent, displaying advanced tool use and distinct cultural patterns in the wild.

The Bornean Orangutan is classified as “Critically Endangered” on the IUCN Red List, with deforestation, palm oil plantations and hunting posing a serious threat to its continued existence.

The total number of Bornean Orangutans is estimated to be less than 14% of what it was in the recent past. This sharp decline has occurred mostly over the past few decades due to human activities and development.

Species distribution is now highly patchy throughout Borneo; it is apparently absent or uncommon in the southeast of the island, as well as in the forests between the Rejang River in central Sarawak and the Padas River in western Sabah (including the Sultanate of Brunei). A population of around 6,900 is found in Sabangau National Park, but this environment is at risk.

According to Harvard University anthropologist, Cheryl Knott, in 10 to 20 years, Orangutans are expected to be extinct in the wild if no serious effort is made to overcome the threats they are facing.

A Cappella by thingswithwings (G)

May. 18th, 2017 11:58 pm
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Posted by ext_4091985

Show: SGA

Rec Category: Teyla Emmagan
Characters: Teyla Emmagan
Categories: Gen
Warnings: None
Author on LJ: thingswithwings
Author's Website: thingswithwings at AO3
Link: A Cappella

Why This Must Be Read: Teyla sings to the people of Earth about the people of Pegasus. A spare and touching piece.

Bonus: Podfic by exmanhater

After declassification, Rodney gets a Nobel, and John gets a few medals from the President, and Keller gets a research institution named after her, and Ronon gets largely ignored.

Teyla, though. Teyla gets a record deal.

[syndicated profile] zooborns_feed

Posted by Andrew Bleiman

1_Rare pheasant chicks hatch in Chester Zoo first  (25)

A rare Pheasant, usually found in the rainforests of South East Asia, has been successfully bred at Chester Zoo for the first time. Two Great Argus Pheasant chicks hatched on May 3, after a 24-day incubation.

With Great Argus Pheasant numbers in steep decline across much of its native range, keepers at the Zoo have hailed the arrival of the young pair.

The birds, which are found on the Malaysian peninsula, south Myanmar, South West Thailand, Borneo and Sumatra, are iconic in their homeland but are threatened by hunting and habitat loss.

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4_Rare pheasant chicks hatch in Chester Zoo first  (22)Photo Credits: Chester Zoo 

Andrew Owen, Curator of Birds, said, “The Great Argus Pheasant [Argusianus argus] is under real pressure in parts of South East Asia. Like so many bird species in that part of the world, they are the victim of rapid deforestation and illegal trapping.”

“Great Argus males, in particular, are amongst the most unusual and distinctive of all birds, with their astonishingly long wing and tail feathers adorned with thousands of eye-spots. It is their beauty, which is, in part, what makes them so prized by hunters. To have two chicks hatch here for the very first time in the zoo’s long history is a great achievement; they’re certainly important young birds.”

As part of its mating ritual, the male constructs a ring on the ground out of sticks and twigs, then calls to entice a female to enter into the circle. He then performs a mating dance, culminating in him spreading his wings wide to show off a complex pattern of eyespots in his plumage.

It is these ‘eye-spots’ that give the Argus Pheasant its name: Argus Panoptes (or Argos) being a many-eyed giant in Greek mythology.

The Great Argus Pheasant has been evaluated and is currently classified as “Near Threatened” on the IUCN Red List.

More great pics below the fold!

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[syndicated profile] zooborns_feed

Posted by Andrew Bleiman

1_Julie Larsen Maher_2192_American Bison and Calves_BZ_05 01 17

Six American Bison calves have been born at WCS’s (Wildlife Conservation Society) Bronx Zoo, and four of them are now on exhibit on the Zoo’s ‘Bison Range’.

The calves were born to a herd of seven females and one male that arrived at the Bronx Zoo from Ft. Peck, Montana in November 2016.

The herd was a historic gift from the Assiniboine and Sioux tribes. The Fort Peck Bison are from the Yellowstone National Park bloodline and are among the few pure Bison remaining. The vast majority of present-day Bison, or Buffalo, have trace amounts of domestic cattle genes, a reflection of past interbreeding efforts when western ranchers tried to create a hardier breed of cattle. (More information about the historic gift and transfer can be found at the WCS Newsroom: http://bit.ly/2qTVHvF ).

The female Bison were pregnant when they arrived at the Zoo, and the calves were born in late April. “These calves will bolster our efforts to expand our breeding program of pure Bison,” said Dr. Pat Thomas, WCS Vice President/General Curator and Associate Director of the Bronx Zoo. “They will eventually be bred with other pure Bison to create new breeding herds in other AZA-accredited zoos, and to provide animals for restoration programs in the American West.”

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4_Julie Larsen Maher_1918_American Bison and Calves_BZ_05 01 17Photo Credits: WCS/ Julie Larsen Maher

The Bronx Zoo has a long history of facilitating Bison conservation projects in the western U.S., and the birth of these calves provides a welcome boost to the Zoo’s ongoing efforts to establish a herd of pure Bison.

For more than five years, the Bronx Zoo has worked on developing a herd of pure bloodline through embryo transfer. The Bison from Ft. Peck will supplement those efforts. The bull, currently on exhibit with the females and calves, was the first American Bison born as a result of embryo transfer in 2012. (More information about the Bronx Zoo’s efforts to breed bison through embryo transfer can be found on the WCS Newsroom: http://bit.ly/2q6kji7 ).

The American Bison (Bison bison), also commonly known as the “American Buffalo” or simply “Buffalo”, is a species that once roamed the grasslands of North America in massive herds. They became nearly extinct by a combination of commercial hunting and slaughter in the 19th century and introduction of bovine diseases from domestic cattle.

However, the Bison is now an American conservation success story. In the early 1900’s, the species was on the verge of extinction: numbering fewer than 1,100 individuals, after roaming North America in the tens of millions only a century earlier. In 1907 and 1913, the Bronx Zoo sent herds of Bronx-bred Bison out west to re-establish the species in its native habitat.

WCS is continuing its tradition of using science-based solutions both in the field and in its wildlife parks to maintain viable bison populations and to preserve this icon of American heritage. One goal within this vision is to create and maintain ecologically functional herds of bison.

In April of 2016, WCS and other members of the American Bison Coalition, scores of Bison-friendly groups, organizations, and businesses celebrated passage of the National Bison Legacy Act by Congress, making the Bison the National Mammal of the United States. President Obama signed the legislation on May 9, 2016.

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[syndicated profile] zooborns_feed

Posted by Andrew Bleiman

1_5 days old

A lively trio of North American River Otter pups recently made their debut at Oakland Zoo. A male and two females were born February 9, and they were introduced to the public prior to Mother’s Day weekend. According to keepers, their mom, Rose, has been doing a great job taking care of her new litter.

Zookeepers have also given names to the active pups. The boy has been named Si’ahl (“see-all”), and his sisters have been named Imnaha (“em-na-ha”) and Talulah (“ta-lou-la”).

The arrival of the pups brings the total number of North American River Otters, at Oakland Zoo, to six: their mom, dad Wyatt, and grandma, Ginger (Ginger is mother to Rose).

The pups are still nursing, but have begun eating solid foods consisting of fish and some meat.

Dad, Wyatt, is Oakland Zoo’s only adult male and was relocated to Oakland three years ago from the Abilene Zoo, in Texas, where the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) gave him a breeding recommendation.

“We are pleased to have our sixth healthy litter of Otter pups since 2011. This is Rose’s second litter, and we are happy that she is once again being a great mother to her pups. You can see Rose and her three pups daily at the Oakland Zoo, in the Children’s Zoo,” said Adam Fink, Zoological Manager, Oakland Zoo.

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4_Two and a half months old_3Photo Credits: Oakland Zoo

Zookeepers have been tracking the baby Otters’ growth and health with bi-weekly checkups, referred to as "pupdates" to Zoo staff. Rose has only very recently been venturing into the exhibit with her pups. Swimming is not instinctual; therefore, pups do not go on exhibit until they are strong enough swimmers and a certain size.

Zoo guests are now able to watch the new pups in their exhibit daily. The River Otter exhibit is located in the Wayne and Gladys Valley Children's Zoo.

The North American River Otter (Lontra canadensis), also known as the “Northern River Otter” or the “Common Otter”, is a semiaquatic mammal endemic to the North American continent found in and along its waterways and coasts.

The species is currently classified as “Least Concern” on the IUCN Red List. However, habitat degradation and pollution are major threats to their conservation.

5_Three and a half months

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[syndicated profile] zooborns_feed

Posted by Andrew Bleiman

1_baby chicken trutles - all three

Three Chicken Turtles hatched in mid-April at the Tennessee Aquarium. The tiny trio hatched from eggs that were laid in January by adults in the Aquarium’s ‘Delta Swamp’ exhibit.

At their initial exam, each of these hatchlings measured less than two inches long. As adults, they will grow to about 10 inches in length.

2_baby chicken turtle front

3_baby chicken turtle with rulerPhoto Credits: Tennessee Aquarium

The Chicken Turtle (Deirochelys reticularia) is an uncommon freshwater turtle native to the southeastern United States.

The name "chicken" commonly refers to the taste of their meat, which, at one time, was popular in southern U.S. markets. The species is characterized by a long neck and unique coloring, which could also contribute to the reason for their name.

The Tennessee Aquarium’s herpetologists often point out that Chicken Turtles look as if they are wearing striped pants when viewed from behind.

Chicken Turtles are semiaquatic turtles, found both in water and on land. They prefer quiet, still bodies of water such as shallow ponds and lakes, ditches, marshes, cypress swamps, and bays. They prefer water with dense vegetation and soft substrate.

The turtles are omnivorous, eating crayfish, fish, fruits, insects, invertebrates, frogs, tadpoles, and plants. During the first year of their lives, they are almost completely carnivorous.

Eggs hatch in about 152 days. The turtles lay eggs during the winter months, with the eggs hatching in the spring. The eggs undergo diapauses: meaning, the eggs don’t develop immediately after laying as with other species of turtles.

The Chicken Turtle is currently classified as “Least Concern” by the IUCN. Populations are currently considered stable throughout their range, although they do face potential threats.

Habitat destruction reduces suitable habitat for foraging, migration, and hibernation. Chicken Turtles are sometimes killed while crossing roadways, as they migrate between habitats.

[syndicated profile] zooborns_feed

Posted by Chris Eastland

Baby_tapir-Umi_01Denver Zoo is happy to announce the birth of Umi, an endangered Malayan Tapir. The female calf, whose name means “life” in Malayan, was born to mother Rinny and father Benny early in the morning on May 6. She is only the third Malayan Tapir ever  born at the Denver Zoo. 

Baby_tapir-Umi_02
Baby_tapir-Umi_03Photo Credit: Denver Zoo



Rinny has already proven to be a very patient mother, calmly making sure Umi is nursing successfully. Rinny was born at Seattle’s Woodland Park Zoo and Benny, who was born at the City of Belfast Zoo in Ireland were paired under recommendation of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) Species Survival Plan (SSP) which ensures healthy populations and genetic diversity among zoo animals.

Though they are most closely related to Horses and Rhinos, Tapirs are similar in build to Pigs, but significantly larger. Malayan Tapirs have a large, barrel shaped body ideal for crashing through dense forest vegetation. Their noses and upper lips are extended to form a long, prehensile snout, similar to a stubby version of an Elephant’s trunk. Malayan Tapirs are the largest of the four Tapir species. As adults, they can stand more than three feet tall and are six to eight feet long. Adult Tapirs weigh between 700 and 900 pounds. They are excellent swimmers and spend much of their time in water. They can even use their flexible noses as snorkels!

As adults, Malayan Tapirs have a distinctive color pattern that some people say resembles an Oreo cookie, black in the front and back, separated by a white or gray midsection. This provides excellent camouflage that breaks up the Tapir’s outline in the shadows of the forest. By contrast, young Tapirs have color patterns that more resemble brown watermelons, with spots and stripes, which help them blend into the dappled sunlight and leaf shadows of the forest to protect them from predators.

Malayan Tapirs are the only Tapir native to Asia. Once found throughout Southeast Asia, they now inhabit only the rain forests of the Indochinese peninsula and Sumatra. With a wild population of less than 2,000 individuals, they are classified as Endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), due to habitat loss and hunting. 

Helpless Plaything (by torch) (E)

May. 14th, 2017 11:26 am
[syndicated profile] stargateficrec_feed

Posted by ext_4078282

Show: SGA

Rec Category: Slavefic
Characters: Rodney McKay/John Sheppard/Ronon Dex
Categories: slash
Warnings: "Creator Chose Not To Use Archive Warnings" - dubcon, but see my notes below.
Author on LJ: flambeau
Author's Website: See the AO3
Link: Helpless Plaything on AO3

Why This Must Be Read: This is one of my favourite id-fic series where John's a sex slave who's an impulse buy at the market for Rodney and Ronon. Torch explains the series thus: "So, John Sheppard falls through a quantum mirror and ends up in a universe where Rodney and Ronon are warlords. And hey, they like him." They sure do! (There's more explanation about how these fics came about here, with an interesting take on Rodney and Ronon's relationship.) Yes, it's dubcon, in that John's given an aphrodisiac, but it's not like he doesn't know Ronon and Rodney, and, I suspect, already want them. He's remarkably unfazed by it all, anyway, and just goes with it and enjoys himself. The whole series is like dreamy snapshots of the AU world, with not a lot of plot, where Torch basically wanted to write porn but couldn't help slipping in some worldbuilding. :)  If you like competent in-charge Rodney and Ronon and bottom!John with extreme sex-slave hotness, it's a treat.


They walked up and stopped right in front of him, and John could only stare. Oh, Ronon looked like Ronon, pretty much; his beard was a little different, his boots were a little different, but he was his usual armed and leather-wearing self, though he was eating a chunk of bread and looking relaxed and pleased with the world. Rodney, now — Rodney was dressed pretty much like Ronon was, down to the sword and all the other weapons. And the leather. He was broader, dense and heavy with muscle; he had a fighter's lumpy knuckles; his face was thinner and a bit more lined, with a scar across the jaw. His eyes seemed almost more blue, bright and cheerful.

"That's pretty," he said approvingly, and John realized suddenly that Rodney was staring right at him. "It's been a while since we had a pet."

Ronon made a noncommittal sound. "Isn't he a bit old?" He tilted his head, squinting in the sunlight as he considered John. "Looks good, though. I guess we could give him a try."

John opened his mouth, but he couldn't think of a single thing to say.

"All right, we'll take him." Rodney snapped his fingers and pointed imperiously. "Have him delivered. Not in a basket."


Meet Pedro & Perdy the Penguins

May. 13th, 2017 06:08 am
[syndicated profile] zooborns_feed

Posted by Andrew Bleiman

Two penguin Chicks 2 - Paradise Park

Two rare Humboldt Penguin chicks named Pedro and Perdy are being reared by keepers at Paradise Park Wildlife Sanctuary.

Penguins typically lay two eggs a few days apart. When the first chick hatches, it receives all of mom and dad’s attention. Penguin chicks are very demanding and squeal loudly as they appeal for food, which is regurgitated by the parents.  By the time the second chick hatches a few days after its sibling, the older chick, which may have nearly doubled in size by now, continues to get all the attention and parents may ignore the younger chick. The younger chicks in penguin nests often do not survive in nature.

Because Humboldt Penguins are rare, keepers took the Pedro and Perdy, who were both second chicks, into their care to ensure the birds’ survival.

Two penguin Chicks - Paradise Park
Two penguin Chicks 4 - Paradise ParkPhoto Credit: Paradise Park


Keeper Bev Tanner explains, “Pedro and Perdy are being hand-reared as often in a nest with two chicks only one is successfully raised by the parents. As this is an endangered species it is very worthwhile for us to take the second chick and rear it to increase our flock.”   

When chicks are in the nest, they have fluffy grey down feathers. They remain in the nest for about three months, at which time they have developed the waterproof plumage needed for swimming. Juveniles are grey and white, developing the distinctive black-and-white adult plumage at one year old. The pattern of dark speckles on the adult’s lower chest is unique to each Penguin and helps to identify each individual.

Humboldt Penguins are native to the western coast of South America, where they fish in the cold Humboldt current for which they are named.  They are listed as Vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.  Historically, Humboldt Penguins were threatened by extensive mining for their guano (accumulated droppings), which was used for fertilizer. Today, the main threats are habitat loss and competition with invasive species.

See more photos of Pedro and Perdy below.


Two penguin Chicks 6 - Paradise Park
Two penguin Chicks 3 - Paradise Park
Two penguin Chicks 5 - Paradise Park








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