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Posted by Andrew Bleiman

1_Crías de gacela Mhorr en la Sabana africana de BIOPARC Valencia - marzo 2017

The entrance of spring has brought the births of many animals at BIOPARC Valencia, and among them is the Dama Gazelle.

In 2014, three females and a young male arrived at BIOPARC Valencia with the aim of creating a breeding group. The park recently welcomed the birth of two calves and expects the arrival of a third calf any day now. This was the "premiere" of the park’s male as a father, and the new calves offer hope for the survival of this beautiful species.

2_Crías de gacela Mhorr en la Sabana africana de BIOPARC Valencia - marzo 2017 (3)

3_Crías de gacela Mhorr en la Sabana africana de BIOPARC Valencia - marzo 2017 (2)Photo Credits: BIOPARC Valencia

The Dama Gazelle (Nanger dama), also known as the Addra Gazelle or Mhorr Gazelle, is a species native to Africa in the Sahara desert and the Sahel.

This Gazelle has been classified as “Critically Endangered” on the IUCN Red List. It has disappeared from most of its former range due to overhunting and habitat loss, and natural populations only remain in Chad, Mali, and Niger. Its habitat includes grassland, shrubland, semi-deserts, open savanna and mountain plateaus. Their diets includes grasses, leaves (especially Acacia leaves), shoots, and fruit.

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Posted by Chris Eastland

PA_Kattas2 (1)

The Ring-tailed Lemur habitat at Zoo Vienna Schönbrunn just got a lot livelier with the birth of twins on March 18.

Mom has her hands full nursing her two tiny babies, but she is doing well and gets extra help from other females in the group. Twins are not uncommon in Ring-tailed Lemurs. 

PA_Kattas1 (1)
PA_Kattas3 (1)Photo Credit: Schönbrunn Zoo/Norbert Potensky

For the first few days of life, the babies spent most of their time nursing or sleeping as they clung to mom’s belly.  Newborn Lemurs are born with the ability to grip mom’s fur tightly so they can hang on as she climbs through the trees. After a few weeks, the babies will climb onto mom’s back and start to view their surroundings.  By one month of age, the babies will start to nibble on fruits and vegetables.

Ring-tailed Lemurs are one of about 100 species of Lemurs, all of which are found only on the African island of Madagascar.  More than two thirds of the species are Endangered or Critically Endangered according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature. 

A dramatic loss of forest habitat in Madagascar is blamed for the rapid decline in Lemur numbers.  More than 90% of Madagascar’s original forest cover has been lost, mainly due to the demand for lumber, firewood, and charcoal by a growing human population.



[syndicated profile] zooborns_feed

Posted by Andrew Bleiman

17352433_10154941852100479_3804671967843059119_nFiona the Hippo has captured the hearts of hundreds of thousands of fans since her premature birth was announced by the Cincinnati Zoo and shared here on ZooBorns. 

Fiona was born six weeks premature on January 24 and was unable to stand and nurse from her mother, Bibi.  After Bibi ignored her tiny baby, keepers decided to care for the baby in the zoo’s nursery.  Under the expert care of the zoo’s staff, Fiona has grown from a mere 29 pounds (less than half the normal weight for a Hippo calf) to more than 100 pounds today.

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Photo Credit:  Cincinnati Zoo

 

The zoo’s nursery staff has helped Fiona overcome several health hurdles, including underdeveloped lungs, finding the right milk formula for her, regulating her body temperature, and keeping her hydrated.  No other zoo has raised a premature baby Hippo before.

Fiona has learned to walk, including up a ramp leading into her exercise pool.  She has learned to swim and exhibits all the normal behaviors of a Hippo.

Keepers hope to reunite Fiona with Bibi and Henry, Fiona’s father. Bibi and Fiona were separated during the normal bonding time between mother and calf, so it is unlikely that Bibi will recognize Fiona as her offspring.  However, the staff expects Bibi and Henry to welcome Fiona into the bloat just as they would any other new Hippo.

Eventually, Fiona will become too large to be cared for in a hands-on manner by keepers.  For now, Fiona and her parents can see and hear each other, but they are separated by a protective barrier. The staff will begin working to transition Fiona to the bloat so she can become a well-adjusted Hippo.

 

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Posted by Andrew Bleiman

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Keepers at Jacksonville Zoo recently discovered the egg their Wattled Cranes were sitting on was not fertilized. They contacted their friends at White Oak Conservation for assistance. White Oak happened to have a pair of Wattled Cranes who laid an extra egg.

The average clutch size of the Wattled Crane is thought to be the smallest of any of the world's cranes. Generally, in a nest of two or more eggs, only one chick will survive to hatch or fledge. Therefore, removing the extra egg was a possible ‘saving grace’ for the chick inside.

As a first step, keepers at Jacksonville Zoo decided to swap out the non-viable egg from their nest to a dummy egg, until they knew White Oak’s extra egg was close to hatching. When that time came, keepers at Jacksonville placed the egg in their birds’ nest. The egg hatched on March 5th, and they now have a healthy male chick!

The cranes are raising the ‘adopted’ chick as their own, and visitors to Jacksonville Zoo can see the new family at the African Boardwalk exhibit!

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4_17362666_10155147092603336_3231133601383594295_nPhoto Credits: Rob Bixby 

The Wattled Crane (Grus carunculata) is a large bird found in Africa, south of the Sahara Desert.

It is the largest crane in Africa, at a height of up to 175 cm (5.74 ft) and is the second tallest species of crane, after the Sarus Crane. The wingspan is 230–260 cm (7.5–8.5 ft), the length is typically 120 cm (3.9 ft) and weight is 6.4–7.9 kg (14–17 lb) in females, 7.5–9 kg (17–20 lb) in males.

The Wattled Crane is native to eleven sub-Saharan countries in Africa, including an isolated population in the highlands of Ethiopia. More than half of the world’s Wattled Cranes occur in Zambia, but the single largest concentration occurs in the Okavango Delta of Botswana.

All cranes are omnivorous. The principal food of the Wattled Crane is mainly aquatic: tubers and rhizomes of submerged sedges and water lilies. It is one of the more herbivorous of extant cranes. The other primary portion of the diet consists of aquatic insects. They will supplement the diet with snails, amphibians and snakes when the opportunity arises. Roughly 90% of foraging done by this species occurs in shallow waters. They typically forage by digging vigorously with their bill into the muddy soil. On occasion, it will eat grain and grass seed as well.

Wattled Cranes commence their breeding season around April. Most nests are sloppily crushed impressions of grass along the border of a marsh. Eggs are laid approximately 3 weeks after the nests are built. The average clutch size of the species is reportedly the smallest of any of the world's cranes, with an average of 1.6 eggs. Even if there are two eggs, usually only one chick successfully survives to hatch or fledge. The incubation period, roughly 33 to 36 days, is on average the longest of any crane and both parents participate. The chicks are immediately fed by both parents, which take shifts. After around 80 days, the offspring start to forage with their parents. At the first sign of any danger, the parents force their young into tall grasses to hide. The fledging period occurs at 100–150 days, the longest it takes any crane to fledge. The young remain with their parents for up to a year (when the next breeding period starts) and may gather in flocks with unrelated juveniles.

The Wattled Crane is currently classified as “Vulnerable” by the IUCN. Destruction, alteration, and degradation of wetland habitats constitute the most significant threats to the bird.

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April reccers: volunteer post

Mar. 23rd, 2017 08:36 pm
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Posted by sg_fignewton

This entry will be open to volunteers through March 31st. The official list of monthly reccers will be posted on the following Sunday.

Comment with the username you'll be using to rec and the category you want, choosing a category from the list below or selecting a more rare category that has been used in the past. If you want to rec a category that is not on the list below or in the community memories, feel free to ask. Remember that you may volunteer for a category that isn't listed.

By signing up, you are committing yourself to reccing at least two (preferably four) stories in that category during the month of April. March reccers may only sign up for next month after posting their minimum two recs for this month. The FAQ and rec template, with detailed instructions, can be found here.

You must be a member of stargateficrec in order to post, so if you're a new reccer, be sure to join the community.

Genre

Humor
Drama
Crossover
Alternate Universe
Team
Episode Related
SGU
Slash
Het
Gen
Other (specify)


Pairings

John/Teyla
John/Rodney
Elizabeth/John
Daniel/Janet
Daniel/Vala
Janet/Sam
Jack/Daniel
Jack/Sam
Sam/Rodney
Other (specify)

Friendship

Jack and Sam
Jack and Daniel
John and Rodney
Sam and Janet
John and Elizabeth
Daniel and Sam
Elizabeth and Teyla
Carson and Rodney
Other (specify)

Character

Teyla Emmagen
Elizabeth Weir
John Sheppard
Rodney McKay
Cameron Mitchell
Jonas Quinn
Ronon Dex
Aiden Ford
Janet Fraiser
Teal'c
Samantha Carter
Daniel Jackson
Jack O'Neill
Vala Mal Doran
Evan Lorne
General Hammond
Carson Beckett
Other (specify)

Remember: first come, first claimed.
[syndicated profile] zooborns_feed

Posted by Andrew Bleiman

1_IMG_20170301_151346508 Lemur male Han 3

Two Ring-tailed Lemurs were born to different mothers at the Staten Island Zoo just one day apart, becoming the first Lemurs to have been born on Staten Island in the 80-year history of the zoo!

A female named Jyn, was born February 7, and a male, named Han, was born February 8. Both weighed approximately 65 grams (2.29 ounces) at birth.

The babies are half-siblings and share a father. The entire family can be seen in the zoo’s Africa wing.

2_Lemur female Jyn with mom E

3_Lemur female Jyn with mom D

4_IMG_20170301_151340457 Lemur male Han 1Photo Credits: Staten Island Zoo (Images 1,4: male, Han / Images 2,3,5,6: female, Jyn)

The Ring-tailed Lemur (Lemur catta) is a large strepsirrhine primate and recognized due to its long, black and white ringed tail. It belongs to Lemuridae, one of five Lemur families, and is the only member of the Lemur genus.

It is endemic to the island of Madagascar and inhabits deciduous forests, dry scrub, humid forests, and gallery forests along riverbanks. The species is omnivorous and the diet includes flowers, herbs, bark and sap, as well as spiders, caterpillars, cicadas, grasshoppers, and small vertebrates.

The Ring-tailed Lemur is the most terrestrial of extant lemurs. It is also diurnal, being active exclusively in daylight hours.

The Ring-tailed Lemur is highly social, living in groups (troops) of up to 30 individuals. It is also female dominant, a trait common among Lemurs.

Gestation lasts for about 135 days. In the wild, one offspring is the norm, although twins may occur. Ring-tailed Lemur infants have an average birth weight of 70 g (2.5 oz) and are carried on the chest for the first 1 to 2 weeks, then on the back.

Young Lemurs begin to eat solid food after two months and are fully weaned after five months. Sexual maturity is reached between 2.5 and 3 years. Male involvement in infant rearing is limited, although the entire troop, regardless of age or sex, can be seen caring for the young. ‘Alloparenting’ between troop females has been reported. The longest-lived Ring-tailed Lemur in the wild was a 20-year-old female at the Berenty Reserve. The maximum lifespan reported in captivity was 27 years.

Despite reproducing readily in captivity and being the most populous Lemur in zoos worldwide, numbering more than 2,000 individuals, the Ring-tailed Lemur is currently classified as “Endangered” by the IUCN Red List. Threatening factors include: habitat destruction, hunting for bush meat, and the exotic pet trade.

5_Lemur female Jyn and parents A

6_IMG_4483 Lemur female Jyn  2

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Posted by sg_fignewton

Show: SG-1

Rec Category: Teal'c and Vala friendship
Characters: Teal'c, Vala Mal Doran, Cameron Mitchell, Samantha Carter, Daniel Jackson
Categories: humor, five things, team, gen
Warnings: none
Author on LJ: amathela
Author's Website: Amathela at AO3
Link: The Case Of The Missing Jello (Among Others)

Why This Must Be Read: It's an alien conspiracy!

Okay, it's just five times Vala and Teal'c totally pwned their teammates. With and without jello. :)


"There," Vala says, as the ball flies neatly towards the basket. "That doesn't look too hard."

Teal'c hands her the ball, and she sets off without dribbling. Cam doesn't bother to argue as he dashes forward, just missing when Teal'c lifts her up to dunk the ball into the hoop. Cam frowns, and as Vala laughs, smiling up at Teal'c, he thinks this probably wasn't the best idea he's ever had.

"You've got to bounce the ball," he says, but it's a lost cause; he's been outplayed, and he knows it.

When Teal'c and Vala win by a humiliating margin, he doesn't bother to point out that they were cheating.

Notion (by ladyflowdi) (E)

Mar. 23rd, 2017 09:44 am
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Posted by mific

Show: SGA

Rec Category: John Sheppard (road trips)
Characters: Rodney McKay/John Sheppard
Categories: slash
Warnings: Grief, loss of Atlantis
Author on LJ: ladyflowdi
Author's Website: See the AO3
Link: Notion on AO3

Why This Must Be Read: Ladyflowdi says in the story's introduction that this story was written in 2006, so after "The Return" when John and Rodney think they've lost Atlantis forever. the author says: "there are certain stories all writers create that push them to become better at their craft. This one was one of them for me." It's a road trip from Cheyenne to John's old storage unit at San Antonio, in which John and Rodney grieve, and take comfort in each other. We can console ourselves with the eventual outcome, but they don't know what's going to happen. It's set before canon gave us John's wealthy business-owning backstory so treat it like an AU in that respect. Well written, and recommended.


He squeezes Rodney’s neck, once. “Want to stop for some of the best texmex in all of west Texas?”

Rodney doesn’t say the obvious -- that it’s four in the morning and no one in their right mind would think about enchiladas at that hour unless they were pregnant. Instead, he brushes his fingers over John’s, tracing the square of his nails with his fingertips. His face is a silhouette, but his voice is strong. “I‘ve never met an enchilada that didn‘t try to kill me.”

“We‘ll make sure there’s no citrus,” John says, because he’s grown up eating it and knows what he’s talking about. “It’s pretty spicy, though. You up for that, Captain Bland?”

“Hey,” Rodney says, but doesn’t follow it with an insult. “John.”

“Yeah?”

Rodney doesn’t answer, but he goes pale, and John pulls over in time.

The SUV kicks up gravel and mud. John’s barely gotten the car stopped when Rodney opens the door and throws up for what seems like forever, coffee and bile and hurt, until he’s shaky and exhausted.

And then he closes the door, and drinks some of John’s murky cold coffee, and they move on.


[syndicated profile] zooborns_feed

Posted by Andrew Bleiman

1_Pygmy Hippo Calf 1_Photo by Paul Fahy

Taronga Zoo is celebrating the arrival of an endangered Pygmy Hippo calf!

The female calf was born to first-time parents Fergus and Kambiri on February 21, and she is the first of her kind born at the Zoo in nearly seven years. Taronga Zoo is also planning a competition to help choose a name for the calf.

The calf made her public debut under the watchful eye of her mother and keepers. Visitors can now begin to, hopefully, catch glimpses of the rare newborn on Taronga’s Rainforest Trail as she starts to explore outdoors and perfect the art of swimming.

“Pygmy Hippos naturally spend a lot of time in the water, so the calf is already having a great time learning to swim next to mum and even practicing holding her breath underwater,” said Keeper, Renae Moss.

“We’ve started by filling the pond to about 40 cm deep, but we’ll gradually increase the depth of the water as the little one grows in confidence.”

2_Pygmy Hippo Calf 9_Photo by Paul Fahy

3_Pygmy Hippo Calf 3_Photo by Paul Fahy

4_Pygmy Hippo Calf 4_Photo by Paul FahyPhoto Credits: Paul Fahy / Taronga Zoo

Weighing about five kilograms at birth, the calf is growing at a healthy pace and has begun mouthing solid foods: “The calf is absolutely thriving. She’s putting on weight every day and she’s already got little rolls of fat around her neck,” Renae continued.

A vital addition to the region’s insurance population of Pygmy Hippos, the calf is the first born at Taronga since Kambiri in June 2010.

“Kambiri is proving to be an absolute natural as a mother. She’s very attentive and a great teacher, guiding the calf as she learns to swim and showing her what foods to eat,” said Renae.

“It’s also important for the calf to learn these natural mothering behaviors, as we hope she’ll grow up to be an excellent mum herself. With as few as 2000-3000 Pygmy Hippos remaining in the wild, every little calf is important.”

Native to the forests and swamps of West Africa, the Pygmy Hippopotamus (Choeropsis liberiensis or Hexaprotodon liberiensis) is a solitary animal that generally only comes together for breeding. Little is known about them in the wild, with the majority of research recorded about the species learned from those cared for in zoos. The species is currently classified as “Endangered” on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

“These elusive animals continue to be threatened by loss of habitat as their forest homes are logged and converted to farmland at an alarming rate. They are also vulnerable to poaching, hunting and civil unrest and their wild populations continue to decline. Protecting their natural habitat is critical in ensuring the survival of wild populations and we can all help Pygmy Hippos by choosing paper and wood products certified by the Forest Stewardship Council,” Renae concluded.

More great pics below the fold!

5_Pygmy Hippo Calf 2_Photo by Paul Fahy

6_Pygmy Hippo Calf 10_Photo by Paul Fahy

7_Pygmy Hippo Calf 11_Photo by Paul Fahy

8_Pygmy Hippo Calf 17_Photo by Paul Fahy

9_Pygmy Hippo Calf 12_Photo by Paul Fahy

10_Pygmy Hippo Calf 15_Photo by Paul Fahy

11_Pygmy Hippo Calf 19_Photo by Paul Fahy

12_Pygmy Hippo Calf 20_Photo by Paul Fahy

13_Pygmy Hippo Calf 6_Photo by Paul Fahy

14_Pygmy Hippo Calf 8_Photo by Paul Fahy

[syndicated profile] zooborns_feed

Posted by Andrew Bleiman

1_DSC_0040

A Wallaroo joey is currently being hand-raised by zookeepers at Oakland Zoo. The joey was orphaned when his mother passed away, earlier this month, from an infection.

The male joey is approximately 5 months old. He will be receiving round-the-clock nurturing and care until he is about 8 months of age, when a joey normally emerges from a mother’s pouch. At that age, he will be housed with other Wallaroos in the Zoo’s “Wild Australia” exhibit and learn to be independent.

The joey, yet to be named by his keepers, is bottle fed seven times per day with a high-grade baby formula manufactured in Australia called ‘wombaroo’. Bundled inside a makeshift pouch in a temperature-controlled room, he is also given water twice per day for hydration, as the inside of a mother’s pouch provides moisture and warmth.

The joey’s mother, named Maloo, was three years of age and a first-time mother. On March 1, while on exhibit, she had removed the joey from her pouch, an indication to zookeepers of a problem. Oakland Zoo veterinarians examined her, discovering that she was in need of antibiotics due to an infection. She was treated, but sadly died the following day.

“While staff is very sad about the passing of Maloo, we are working with other AZA facilities to be best prepared for the intense care required to successfully hand-raise a Wallaroo. We are keen to get to know the little joey and prepare him for life with the rest of the mob,” said Andrea Dougall, Assistant Zoological Manager at Oakland Zoo.

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4_DSC_0060Photo Credits: Oakland Zoo

Keepers are taking the joey outside for sun twice per day, and zoo veterinarians are also closely monitoring the infant’s progress. In addition to weight monitoring, tail length, feet, and head size are measured during daily physical exams to ensure health and proper growth. This hands-on infant care will continue for the next three months, until he has grown enough to live independently.

The Wallaroo (Macropus robustus or wallaroo) is any of three closely related species of moderately large macropod, intermediate in size between Kangaroos and Wallabies. The word "wallaroo" is from Dharug (Australian Aboriginal language) walaru.

In general, a large, slim-bodied macropod of the open plains is called a "kangaroo"; a small to medium-sized one, particularly if it is relatively thickset, is a "wallaby": most Wallaroos are only a little smaller than a kangaroo, fairly thickset, and are found in open country. All share a particular habit of stance: wrists raised, elbows tucked close into the body, and shoulders thrown back, and all have a large, black-skinned rhinarium.

5_DSC_0059

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Posted by Andrew Bleiman

1_IMG_4848

Taronga Western Plains Zoo recently announced the arrival of a female Przewalski’s Horse foal!

The filly was born February 22, 2017. She has been named Nuruu after the national park in Mongolia called ‘Khustain Nuruu’, which is one of the few parks where the Przewalski’s Horse can be found in the wild today.

Nuruu is the fourth foal born to experienced mother Suren and sire is Stan. “Both mother and foal are doing well. Nuruu is growing stronger every day and is nursing from her mother regularly across the day,” said Keeper Anthony Dorian.

“Suren is being a fantastic mother. She is very protective and nurturing of her foal and is ensuring none of the other herd members get too close.”

“Both Suren and Nuruu are developing a great bond and Nuruu generally stays by her mother’s side most of the day. She does however enjoy a gallop around the paddock in the mornings,” said Anthony.

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4_IMG_4881Photo Credits: Taronga Western Plains Zoo

Nuruu is the first foal to be born for the year at Taronga Western Plains Zoo, with more expected towards the end of the year. Taronga Western Plains Zoo has a successful history with its breeding program for Przewalski’s Horse. Since the breeding program commenced in 1982 the Zoo has welcomed over 35 foals.

In 1995, Taronga Western Plains Zoo was part of a re-introduction program that saw five Przewalski’s Horses sent from Dubbo to Mongolia to support a collaboration of Zoos releasing animals into the Gobi Desert to boost the declining wild population.

The Przewalski’s Horse (Equus ferus przewalskii) is classified as “Endangered” by the IUCN, and as recently as 1996 was classified as extinct in the wild.

On average, Przewalski females are able to give birth at the age of three and have a gestation period of about 11 to 12 months. Their reproduction process is seasonal, and in Mongolia the season is towards the end of May, June, or July.

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Rebound, by Jb (PG-13)

Mar. 19th, 2017 06:17 pm
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Posted by sg_fignewton

Show: SG-1

Rec Category: Drama
Characters: Jack O'Neill, Daniel Jackson, Teal'c, Samantha Carter, Bill Lee
Categories: gen, Jack and Daniel friendship, Teal'c and Jack friendship, team, angst, hurt/comfort
Warnings: language, serious whumpage
Author on LJ: sg1jb
Author's Website: Jb at AO3
Link: Rebound

Why This Must Be Read: This glorious, intense story is long. And incredibly teamy. Full of Jack and Daniel friendship, and scientific puzzles, and Teal'c sheer stubbornness, and Sam doing her best (and beyond) for her team, and Daniel taking his usual flying leaps of logic, and courage, and drama...

I love each and every one of them here. Bill Lee shines, Janet has a great cameo, and the comfort of the final scene is an absolute joy. Make sure you've got the time to read this all in one sitting, because you won't be able to stop!


Whoa! Jack yanked his hand away. He was so startled by the sudden, completely silent disappearance of the section of wall behind Daniel that for a few precious seconds he wasn't sure what had happened.

Even though it took but a scant second, by the time he jerked out of his surprise and into action the crackling snap following Daniel's backward fall through the void had already happened. He watched with alarm as an energy field of some kind fully established itself in the doorway, in a faintly glittering expanse of pale blue. In the same time it took for him to back off and bring up his weapon, it faded into near invisibility. He knew it wasn't gone, though; that'd be far too easy. A light-speed visual survey later, he rapped out, "Carter, work some magic. Whatever it is, get rid of it," and then softened his tone. "Daniel? Can you hear me? You all right?"

In the room on the other side of the energy field, on a same-looking gunmetal grey floor as the one Jack stood on, and bounded by identically plain walls on three sides, Daniel was awkwardly sprawled on his back. His lips moved, but Jack couldn't hear what he said, and so cautiously moved toward the doorway, lowering his gun so he could get as close as possible. At about eight inches away, he felt a vague tingle start up on the exposed skin of his face and hands, and stopped. Teal'c stepped up beside him, and it was clear he felt it too.

Rare Macaque Born at Chester Zoo

Mar. 19th, 2017 05:28 am
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Posted by Andrew Bleiman

Baby Sulawesi macaque Amidala born to mum Lisa at Chester Zoo (5)

Zoo keepers at Chester Zoo have just released the first photos of a rare baby Sulawesi Crested Macaque born in January.

The tiny female baby, which keepers have named Amidala, is a welcome boost to the European endangered species breeding program that is working to protect Sulawesi's Macaques.  The species is listed as Critically Endangered, with fewer than 5,000 individuals remaining in the wild.

Baby Sulawesi macaque Amidala born to mum Lisa at Chester Zoo (2)
Baby Sulawesi macaque Amidala born to mum Lisa at Chester Zoo (9)Photo Credit:  Chester Zoo

Sulawesi Crested Macaques are the rarest of the seven Macaque species living in rain forests on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi. 

The illegal wildlife trade and large scale habitat loss due to illegal logging has pushed the Sulawesi Crested Macaque to the edge of extinction. They are also targets for poachers and are over-hunted for food. The species’ wild number is believed to have plummeted by around 80% in the last 30 years.

With Amidala’s arrival, there are now 18 Sulawesi Crested Macaques living at Chester Zoo. Amidala was born to parents Lisa and Mamassa.

Conservationists from Chester Zoo works with communities in Sulawesi to help protect forests and the diverse animal species living in them.

Baby Sulawesi macaque Amidala born to mum Lisa at Chester Zoo (1)
Baby Sulawesi macaque Amidala born to mum Lisa at Chester Zoo (4)
Baby Sulawesi macaque Amidala born to mum Lisa at Chester Zoo (6)
Baby Sulawesi macaque Amidala born to mum Lisa at Chester Zoo (10)
Baby Sulawesi macaque Amidala born to mum Lisa at Chester Zoo (12)
Baby Sulawesi macaque Amidala born to mum Lisa at Chester Zoo (13)
Baby Sulawesi macaque Amidala born to mum Lisa at Chester Zoo (14)
Baby Sulawesi macaque Amidala born to mum Lisa at Chester Zoo (17)












Learn Something New (by Speranza) (E)

Mar. 18th, 2017 01:13 pm
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Posted by mific

Show: SGA

Rec Category: John Sheppard (road trips!)
Characters: Rodney McKay/John Sheppard
Categories: slash
Warnings: Nil
Author on LJ: speranza
Author's Website: See the AO3
Link: Learn Something New on AO3

Why This Must Be Read: This one's another McShep road trip, in which John hijacks Rodney's scientific trip back to Earth to take them both surfing. Marvelous banter and humor, lovely Sheppard-flirting and, ultimately, extreme hotness. Plus surfing! A great read and enormous fun.


Sheppard leaned back in his chair and arched an eyebrow and said, "California, huh?" and then somehow he was spinning the crazy idea of going along—of accompanying Rodney to Berkeley because, after all, it wasn't like he was going to go on any missions with Rodney out of the galaxy, and besides, Rodney would need a bodyguard to protect him from all those physics groupies, right? Elizabeth laughed aloud, but Sheppard just looked innocent and said that, honest to God, hand to his heart, it had nothing to do with how good the surfing was in California that time of year, and when Elizabeth laughed again, Rodney looked from one to the other of them like they were out of their minds. "This isn't a vacation!" Rodney shouted. "This is about declassifying research that's going to change the course of physics!" Sheppard shot him a single, swift look, then turned to Elizabeth and said, "So I'm thinking, we tack a couple of days onto the end, drive down the coast and fly out of L.A.," and Elizabeth suppressed a smile and said, "Yes, all right," and then Sheppard said, "Because it's not like any of us need a vacation or anything," and rolled his eyes.

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Posted by Andrew Bleiman

33013402791_f7bbfc861c_oAfter they were ignored by their mother following their birth on February 3, three Malayan Tiger cubs have been cared for by Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden’s nursery staff.  Now, the cubs’  care team includes the zoo’s four-legged, resident nursery companion and former nanny to several zoo babies: Blakely the Australian Shepherd Dog.  The six-year-old super-dog has been called into action to provide snuggling, comfort, and a body for the cubs to climb on.

“He’s more than just a large, warm pillow for the cubs.  Blakely is the adult in the room.  He teaches them proper Tiger etiquette by checking them when they’re getting too rough or aggressive,” said Dawn Strasser, head of Cincinnati Zoo’s nursery staff. “This is something that their human surrogates can’t do.”

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32846043985_44cf5d523a_oPhoto Credits:  Mark Dumont, DJJam, Lisa Hubbard


The cubs, named Chira (because she was treated by a chiropractor), Batari (which means goddess) and Izzy (which means promised by God,) would have received similar cues from their mom. Because being with her is not an option, Blakely is the next best thing.  His baby-rearing resume includes experience with Cheetahs, an Ocelot, a Takin, a Warthog, Wallabies, Skunks, and Bat-eared Foxes.  Last year, to recognize Blakely’s nurturing nature, the City of Cincinnati proclaimed October 19 to be Blakely Day!


“My team can feed and care for the Tiger cubs, but we can’t teach them the difference between a play bite and one that means ‘watch out’. So, that’s Blakely’s job,” said Strasser. “Just a little time with him at this early age will help them learn behaviors that will come in handy when they meet Tigers at other zoos in the future.” The cubs will move to the Zoo’s Cat Canyon this summer after they have received their last round of immunizations.

Malayan Tigers are Critically Endangered, with fewer than 250 breeding-age adults living in the wild.  Less than 100 of these Cats live in zoos, making these three cubs – and Blakely’s job as caregiver – incredibly important to the effort to save Malayan Tigers.

See more photos of Blakely and the Tiger cubs below.

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Posted by Andrew Bleiman

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Milwaukee County Zoo visitors got quite a surprise on March 5 when they witnessed Bactrian Camel, Sanchi, give birth to her calf on exhibit! The handsome camel calf was named Patrick in honor of the Saint Patrick’s Day holiday!

Sanchi has given birth to several calves before, and she is quite accustomed to motherhood. This is the first offspring for dad, Stan. Accordingly, zookeepers are keeping Stan separate from Patrick until they can better assess his anticipated behavior near the calf. Big sister, AJ, also isn’t quite sure what to make of this new addition to the group, and has been keeping her distance for now.

The new guy weighed-in at about 100 pounds at birth and was walking less than two hours later. Zoo staff report that Patrick is extremely confident with loads of personality and was quite a handful during his first veterinary medical exam! Keepers are currently working on desensitizing Patrick to their touch, so his hooves, ears and other areas can be more easily examined by veterinarians as he grows.

For enrichment and as an outlet for his boisterous energy, keepers have been providing Patrick with “jolly balls”, commonly used with horses, which he very much likes to kick at. He is currently nursing from mom but will soon begin exploring solid foods, such as: hay, pellet mix, carrots and apples.

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3_Camel Baby 03-2017-1415 EPhoto Credits: Milwaukee County Zoo

The Bactrian Camel (Camelus bactrianus) is a large, two-humped, even-toed ungulate native to the steppes of Central Asia. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) uses the binomial name Camelus ferus for the wild Bactrian Camel and reserves Camelus bactrianus for the domesticated Bactrian Camel. (Their name comes from the ancient historical region of Bactria.)

There are currently three species of camels: the one-humped Dromedary, the domestic two-humped Bactrian Camel, and the wild Bactrian Camel. Wild Bactrian Camels are listed as “Critically Endangered” by the IUCN, primarily due to hunting and development associated with the mining industry in China and Mongolia.

Bactrian Camels are diurnal, sleeping in the open at night and foraging for food during the day. They are primarily herbivorous. They are able to eat plants that are dry, prickly, salty or bitter, and can ingest virtually any kind of vegetation.

Gestation lasts around 13 months, with most young being born from March through April. One or, occasionally, two calves are produced, and the female can give birth to a new calf every other year. Young Bactrian Camels are precocial, being able to stand and run shortly after birth, and are fairly large at an average birth weight of 36 kg (79 lb). They are nursed for about 1.5 years. The young calf will stay with its mother for three to five years, until it reaches sexual maturity, and often serves to help raise subsequent generations for those years.

The Milwaukee County Zoo hopes its Bactrian Camel herd can serve as ambassadors for the declining wild camel population.

Although the schedule may fluctuate, Patrick is usually on exhibit for several hours beginning at about 10 a.m. daily. He tends to be most active in the morning, so that is an ideal time for visitors to see him. The Zoo encourages visitors to stop by the outdoor Camel Yard and meet the new guy, Patrick!

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Posted by Andrew Bleiman

1_ZSL London Zoo - Baby Colobus Monkey Mandible (3)

ZSL London Zoo recently welcomed a new arrival to its troop of Eastern Black-and-white Colobus Monkeys…a tiny baby named Mandible.

After a six-month gestation period, she was born to mum Sophia on February 2. Mandible was given her unique moniker by zookeepers to fit with the tradition of naming the Colobus family after bones in the body, which includes Mandible’s siblings Anvil and Maxilla.

Bernie Corbett, zookeeper at ZSL London Zoo, said: “Colobus Monkeys are born pure white, and they stay this way until they are around five-months-old when they begin to develop their adult colouring: a glossy black coat with a fringe of long white hairs and a large white tuft at the end of the tail.”

“The new-born Colobus Monkey will cling onto her mum as she swings from tree to tree, leaping metres into the air. Mandible is starting to test out her jumping skills and mimicking mum as she learns new actions and movements.”

“Contrary to what many people believe, not all monkeys eat bananas. This species (Colobus guereza) are leaf eaters; they enjoy a range of leaves, flowers and twigs. A particular favourite of the ZSL London Zoo family are the twigs from an apple tree.”

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4_ZSL London Zoo - Baby Colobus Monkey Mandible (1)Photo Credits: ZSL London Zoo

The Eastern Black-and-white Colobus is native to much of west central and east Africa, including Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, Nigeria, Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda and Chad.

The species is currently classified as “Least Concern” on the IUCN Red List. Although the population is somewhat stable, threats exist in the wild. According to the IUCN: “This species is threatened in parts of its range by habitat loss through deforestation for timber, conversion to exotic forest plantations and conversion to agricultural land (e.g., von Hippel et al. 2000). Hunting may also be severely impacting populations in the western part of the species range; Mwenja (2007) commented, in passing, that this subspecies is killed for its skins by local pastoralists in and around the Matthews Range Forest Reserve.”

The family of Colobus Monkeys, at ZSL London Zoo, is the largest troop in Europe and second largest in the world (according to international zoo database, ZIMS).

The zoo’s troop of 17 will be moving house, in the summer of 2018, to a newly renovated enclosure. Their new home, the iconic Snowdon Aviary, will be transformed into a walk-through exhibit for the stunning primates.

For more information or to visit Mandible and the other 18,000 incredible residents at ZSL London Zoo (and save 10% on ticket prices*), simply book online now at: www.zsl.org  

*Children under three-years-old can visit for free.

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Posted by Andrew Bleiman

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A Mishmi Takin calf, named Nanook, was born on February 19th at Kolmården Wildlife Park. Mother to the handsome male calf is Aisha, and his father is Hobbit.

Nanook is the first successful Takin birth for the Swedish zoo. He was born in the early morning of a cold, snowy day. The name Nanook was chosen by the keepers, in honor of his day of birth, and means ‘polar bear’ in Inuit. At birth, Nanook weighed-in at a healthy 7 kilos.

Kolmården staff reported, “We are very happy that Aisha, first time mum, has taken such good care of Nanook. It’s a break through for us, and the Takin breeding, here in Kolmården. Nanook is a much welcomed addition to our Takin group and the European population.”

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5_takinenPhoto Credits: Kolmården Wildlife Park

Thanks to the zookeeper’s excellent training with Takins, they were able to do a check of Nanook soon after his birth. The calf is considered healthy and is growing.

The new Takin calf is an important part of the EAZA European Studbook breeding programme for Mishmi Takins. Takins are currently classified as “Vulnerable” on the IUCN Red List. Populations in the wild are threatened and decreasing due to hunting and deforestation.

The Mishmi Takin (Budorcas taxicolor taxicolor) is an endangered goat antelope native to India, Myanmar and the People's Republic of China. It is a subspecies of Takin.

The Mishmi Takin is native to southern China and eats bamboo and willow shoots. It has an oily coat to protect it from the fog.

Takin are found in small family groups of around 20 individuals, although older males may lead more solitary existences. In the summer, herds of up to 300 may gather high on mountain slopes.

In the wild, mating generally takes place in July and August. Usually, a single young is born after a gestation period of around eight months.

Takin tend to migrate from upper pastures to lower, more forested areas in winter and favor sunny spots. When disturbed, individuals give a 'cough' as an alarm call, and the herd retreats into thick bamboo thickets and lies on the ground for camouflage.

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Posted by Andrew Bleiman

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Denver Zoo is excited to announce its first successful birth of a Fishing Cat. The cub, whose sex is not yet known, is named Miso-Chi (MEE-soh-CHEE) and was born on January 25.

The cub was born to mother Namfon (NAAM-fawn) and father Ronaldo. Namfon was born at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo, in Washington D.C., in May 2012 and arrived at the Denver Zoo in July 2013. Ronaldo was born in June 2013 at a private facility in Houston, Texas, that specializes in the propagation of rare and endangered species and arrived at Denver Zoo from there in April 2014. The two were paired under recommendation of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) Species Survival Plan (SSP), which ensures healthy populations and genetic diversity among zoo animals. Fortunately, the couple has proved to be an excellent match.

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4_baby_fishing_cat_02Photo Credits: Denver Zoo

Fishing Cats are scattered throughout southwest India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Malaysia, Thailand, Sumatra, Java and Pakistan, living primarily in wetland areas like swamps, marshes and densely vegetated areas along rivers and streams.

As their name suggests, Fishing Cats are powerful swimmers and fish form an important part of their diet. However, they are generalist feeders. Rodents, amphibians and aquatic birds are also fare. The cats have been observed attracting fish by lightly tapping the water’s surface with their paw, mimicking insect movement. They then dive into water to catch the fish that come near and, because their claws do not fully retract, use them like fishing hooks to spear the slippery fish. Fishing Cats also wade in shallow water to hunt for prey to scoop out.

Although they resemble a domestic house cat, they are about twice the size of an average house cat. They can grow from about two to almost three feet long, with a foot long tail. They also weigh 18 to 26 pounds and have stocky builds with short legs. Their fur is olive gray with dark spots arranged in longitudinal stripes down the back and a ringed tail tipped in black. They have flat-nosed faces with short round ears and six to eight distinctive dark lines running from above the eyes between the ears over the head to the neck. Fishing Cats are very much adapted to their semi-aquatic life, with water resistant fur and webbed hind feet to power them through the water. Their short, flattened tail acts as a rudder to help control direction as they swim.

Exact Fishing Cat population numbers in the wild aren’t known because they are so rarely encountered. However, it is believed there are less than 10,000 individuals, and their numbers are declining. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) currently classifies them as “Vulnerable”. Their biggest threats are wetland destruction and conversion to farmland. They are also threatened by pollution from industry, agricultural pesticides, and destructive fishing practices. The species is also threatened by poaching for food, medicine and body parts. In addition, Fishing Cats are often a target of local farmers in their native habitat. The farmers believe the cats are solely responsible for the killing of their small livestock and damage to their fishing nets. While this does happen occasionally, they are often blamed for acts other animals commit. Fishing Cats are also hunted for the exotic pet trade.

Denver Zoo recently voted to donate $1,500 to the Fishing Cat Fund, which seeks to educate the public about Fishing Cats as well as to conserve cats in the wild. The money for this comes from the Zoo’s membership animal care donation “check box,” which supports conservation projects for species of the AZA Species Survival Plan (SSP).

Visitors to the Denver Zoo can see the new cub, alongside mom, learning to dive for live fish in the waters of the Marynelle Philpott Fishing Cat Lagoon exhibit at Toyota Elephant Passage.

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